Clinical Neuroscience

[Editorial message]

SZOK Délia

SEPTEMBER 30, 2012

Clinical Neuroscience - 2012;65(09-10)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Administration of preemptive analgesia by diclofenac to prevent acute postcraniotomy headache]

SIMON Éva, BÁNK Judit, GÁL Judit, SIRÓ Péter, NOVÁK László, FÜLESDI Béla, MOLNÁR Csilla

[Purpose - Postcraniotomy headache (PCH) is a frequent perioperative complication in neuroanesthesia. The aim of the present work was to assess the incidence of PCH and to test the efficacy and safety of preoperatively administered diclofenac. Methods - Patients undergoing craniotomies for intracranial tumor resections were enrolled. In the case group 100 mg diclofenac p.o. one hour prior to surgery was used as a preemptive analgesic along with infiltration of the surgical site with a combination of lidocaine and epinephrine. In controls only surgical site infiltration was used. VAS scores were assessed preoperatively, on the day of surgery (DoS), on the 1st and 5th postoperative days. Results - We have found that PCH of any severity is between 50-90% during the first five days after surgery. The number of cases characterized as “no pain” significantly decreased in the early postoperative period, but remained in both groups still higher on the 5th postoperative day than observed preoperatively. In both groups, the number of headaches characterized as mild pain remained relatively stable and substantial increases in case numbers were observed in moderate and severe headaches, showing a declining tendency over time in the postoperative period. A significant effect of diclofenac pretreatment was observed compared to controls on DoS (χ2: 10.429, p<0.015), on the 1st (χ2: 8.75, p<0.032) and 5th postoperative days (χ2: 14.3, p<0.002). Conclusions - The relatively low incidence of severe PCH on day five in the diclofenac group may indicate that preoperatively administered diclofenac effectively reduces postcraniotomy headache. A randomized study is encouraged to test this hypothesis.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Hungarian neurologists, Gyula Donáth (1849-1944)]

HALÁSZ Péter

Clinical Neuroscience

[Health status and costs of ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary]

PÉNTEK Márta, GULÁCSI László, RÓZSA Csilla, SIMÓ Magdolna, ILJICSOV Anna, KOMOLY Sámuel, BRODSZKY Valentin

[Background and purpose - Data on disease burden of multiple sclerosis from Eastern-Central Europe are very limited. Our aim was to explore the quality of life, resource utilisation and costs of ambulating patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary. Methods - Cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed in two outpatient neurology centres in 2009. Clinical history, health care utilisation in the past 12 months were surveyed, the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the EQ-5D questionnaires were applied. Cost calculation was conducted from the societal perspective. Results - Sixty-eight patients (female 70.6%) aged 38.0 (SD 9.1) with disease duration of 7.8 (SD 6.7) years were involved. Fifty-five (80.9%) had relapsing-remitting form and 52 (76.5%) were taking immunomodulatory drug. The average scores were: Expanded Disability Status Scale 1.9 (SD 1.7), EQ-5D 0.67 (SD 0.28). Mean total cost amounted to 10 902 Euros/patient/year (direct medical 67%, direct nonmedical 13%, indirect costs 20%). Drugs, disability pension and informal care were the highest cost items. Costs of mild (Expanded Disability Status Scale 0-3.5) and moderate (Expanded Disability Status Scale 4.0-6.5) disease were 9 218 and 17 634 Euros/patient/year respectively (p<0.01), that is lower than results from Western European countries. Conclusion - Our study provides current inputs for policy making and contributes to understanding variation of costof- illness of multiple sclerosis in Europe.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurosciences and artificial intelligence]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Role of the intraoperative electrical brain stimulation in conserving the speech and language function in neurosurgical operations of awake patients]

ERÕSS Loránd, FEKETE Gábor, ENTZ László, FABÓ Dániel, BORBÉLY Csaba, KOZÁK Lajos Rudolf, ANDREJKOVICS Mónika, CZIRJÁK Sándor, FEDORCSÁK Imre, NOVÁK László, BOGNÁR László

[Aim of the study - To summarize the results gained with awake craniotomies, which were performed in either low grade glioma patients or epilepsy surgical patients whose tumor or epileptogenic zone, was in the vicinity of eloquent, mostly language, cortices. Patient selection and methods - In our retrospective study we selected 16 patients who were operated awake between 1999-2011 at the Neurosurgical Department of MÁV Kórház Budapest, or at the National Institute of Neurosciences in Budapest, or at the Neurosurgical Department of the University of Debrecen in Debrecen. In the presurgical evaluation if it was possible we performed functional magnetic resonance imaging, tractography and detailed neuropsychological testing. At the National Institute of Neurosciences all patients were operated with the aid of MR guided neuronavigation. Results - Anesthesia was carried out without complications in all of the 16 cases. Monitoring of sleep deepness has significantly contributed to the safety of anesthesia during the superficial anesthezied states of the operation. The intraoperative neuropsychological tasks used for testing language were sensitive enough to judge the little disturbances in speech during stimulation. Stimulation evoked seizures could be adequately managed during surgery and did not influence the outcome of the procedures. The use of neuronavigation helped significantly by planning the optimal place for the craniotomy and by intraoperative orientation. Conclusions - Awake craniotomies require well practiced surgical teams, which requires the cooperation of neuro-anesthesiologits, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologist and electrophysiologists. It has two goals, first to reduce the time of surgery to minimize surgical complications, secondly the detailed intraoperative mapping of cognitive and motor functions to avoid any neurological deficit. The intraoperative anatomical data provided by the neuronavigation and the functional data provided by awake intraoperative stimulation of the patient together serve the safety of the patient which is essential in the neurologically minimal invasive neurosurgical approach of the 21st century.]

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