Clinical Neuroscience

[Differential diagnosis of atypical Parkinsonian syndromes]

CSÓTI Ilona, FORNÁDI Ferenc

MARCH 24, 2010

Clinical Neuroscience - 2010;63(03-04)

[Atypical Parkinson syndromes are distinguished from idiopathic Parkinson disease by insufficient or missing response to dopaminergic replacement therapy and therefore they have significantly unfavorable prognoses. Early differential diagnosis is very important for the patient. It enables the therapist to give suitable consults, to avoid unnecessary or inappropriate therapy, which are not free of medication side effects and furthermore facilitates the selection of adapted symptomatically medical and physical measures of treatment. In case of future development of neuroprotective or causally therapy strategies correct diagnosis will allow an early start of therapy. The differential diagnosis separation of the three clinical pictures from the idiopathic Parkinson disease with clinical criteria might be difficult in the early stage of disease. Additional neuroimaging and nuclear medical investigations may support the clinical probable diagnosis.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Clinicopathological variability in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation]

VINCZE András, KAPÁS István, MOLNÁR J. Mária, KOVÁCS G. Gábor

[Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a rare, progressive neurodegenerative disorder with extrapyramidal and cognitive clinical symptoms characterized by iron accumulation predominantly in the globus pallidus, as well as extensive axonal spheroids in various regions of the brain. Recent studies indicate multiple genetic causes, however the illness can occur without obvious genetic background. The most frequent genetic form is the pantothene kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) with mutation in the pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene. Further forms include phosphoslipase A2 (PLA2G6) gene mutation, neuroferritinopathy, and aceruloplasminaemia. To demonstrate the phenotypic variability associated with NBIA we present two patients. In the first patient iron deposition in the globus pallidus and axonal spheroids throughout the whole brain confirmed the neuropathological diagnosis of NBIA. Based on the long duration (27 years), the relatively late onset (at age of 13) of the disease, and the symmetrical hypointensity in the globus pallidus, without the eye-of-thetiger sign in cranial MRI, this case most likely represented an idiopathic form of NBIA but atypical PKAN may be also considered. In our second patient, who is still alive after duration of 9 years, MRI revealed the typical eye-of-the-tiger phenomenon that supported the clinical diagnosis of NBIA and was highly suggestive of PKAN. Since NBIA shows similarities with other neurodegenerative disorders, genetic examination may be essential in the diagnosis of this disease, however, cranial MRI together with the clinical picture may be highly indicative of NBIA.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Comment of the invited editor]

FOLYOVICH András

Clinical Neuroscience

[History of the Horányi Society]

STIPULA Magda

Clinical Neuroscience

[Numbers, counting and calculating problems in view of cognitive neurology]

MÁRKUS Attila

[The ability to count and calculate is a human-specific skill comprised of understanding numeric values and categories and performing numerical operations; it is an acoustic-verbal symbolic activity that may be expressed in writing and understood by reading. The neuronal bases and precursors of cognitive systems have been supplied to mankind by the process of evolution. Abilities to create symbols (speech, visual letter and number symbols) must have played a decisive role in the emergence of man from the world of primates. Although counting and calculating problems are classified into numerous types, two main forms of dyscalculia have practical importance: the acquired one (the loss of learned knowledge) and the developmental one (the disturbance of the acquisition of arythmetical knowledge).]

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[Neuron to glia - 15 years history of the cytoplasmic]

PAPP Mátyás

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[In memoriam Mátyás Papp]

KOVÁCS Tibor

[Mátyás Papp died on 4th of April, 2019, at the age of 92, following a long disease. He was working for nearly 60 years in the Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University. He was known about his works on the inclusion bodies in multiple system atrophy (Papp-Lantos bodies). He was a honorary member of the International Society of Neuropathology. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CLINICAL FEATURES OF CORTICOBASAL DEGENERATION]

FARSANG Marianna, TAKÁTS Annamária, SZIRMAI Imre, KOVÁCS Tibor

[Corticobasal degeneration was described in 1968 by Rebeiz, Kolodny and Richardson, who characterized the disease as a syndrome of asymmetric akinesis and rigidity, dystonia of the upper limb, apraxia, myoclonus and dementia. Atrophy of the frontal and parietal lobe, neuronal loss, gliosis and achromatic neurones (and nowadays astrocytic plaques) are the characteristic pathological features of the disease. Corticobasal degeneration is a rare or a rarely recognized disease and it is frequently misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s disease. According to the Lang’s criteria, corticobasal degeneration can be diagnosed in the presence of rigidity and one cortical symptom (apraxia, cortical sensory loss, alien hand) or in a patient with rigidity, dystonia and focal reflex myoclonus. Exclusion criteria are early dementia (as in primary degenerative dementias), early vertical gaze problems (as in progressive supranuclear palsy), resting tremor and good, sustained therapeutic response to levodopa (as in Parkinson’s disease), severe autonomic problems (as in multiple system atrophy) and any pathology on imaging studies which might explain the clinical symptoms. It should be mentioned, that recently early dementia is recognized as an initial symptom of corticobasal degeneration. The authors present a case and review the literature to call attention to this disorder.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

TOLVAJ Balázs, HAHN Katalin, NAGY Zsuzsanna, VADVÁRI Árpád, CSOMOR Judit, GELPI Ellen, ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.