Clinical Neuroscience

Die medizinische Psychologie als Theoretische Grundlage der allgemeinen Medizin

W. Iwanow

JULY 01, 1985

Clinical Neuroscience - 1985;38(07)

Die medizinische Psychologie ist gerade das Fach, das diese wesentliche Schwäche der heutigen Medizin überwindet und einen vollständigen Zugang zum Kranken zu schaffen (oder dazu beizutragen) pflegt. Hier geht es nicht nur um eine ,,mechanische Vereinigung" des Somas und der Psyche, sondern um ein tiefstes und vollständigstes Verstehen des psycho-physiologischen Wesens des Menschen.

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