Clinical Neuroscience

[Determining the term of schizencephaly]

KENÉZ József, LEEL-ŐSSY Lóránt

MAY 20, 2007

Clinical Neuroscience - 2007;60(05-06)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGENITAL CATARACTS FACIAL DYSMORPHISM NEUROPATHY SYNDROME - FIRST HUNGARIAN CASE REPORT]

SISKA Éva, NEUWIRTH Magdolna, REBECCA Gooding, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[The congenital cataracts facial dysmorphism neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome (OMIM 604168) is a recently described autosomal recessive developmental disorder. It is almost completely restricted to an endogamous group of the European Vlax Roma population, called the Rudari. The CCFDN syndrome is a complex phenotype involving multiple systems, characterized by facial dysmorphism, congenital cataracts, microcorneae, delayed early motor and intellectual development, hypogonadotrop hypogonadism, hypomyelination of the peripheral nervous system, and serious complications related to general anaesthesia. This disorder is caused by a homozygous mutation of the carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (CTDP1) gene, localized to the 18q23 region. Authors present one genetically identified case in a large Roma family. The case documents that the CCFDN mutation is present also in the Hungarian Roma population. Underlie of antropomorphological data the authors presume that the CCFDN mutation reached Hungary as a result of emigration of Vlax Gypsies in the 18th century. The paper calls attention to the fact that molecular genetic diagnostics can replace invasive methods and makes possible the identification of heterozygotes without clinical symptoms. The introduction of the genetic screening enables us to perform genetic counselling and prevention in this high-risk population.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[100 years of riddle… X. Jubilee Alzheimer’s disease congress on the 100th anniversary of disease description]

Clinical Neuroscience

[THE PREVALENCE OF WHITE MATTER ABNORMALITIES ON MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES IN MIGRAINE]

TÓTH Marianna, KUNDRA Olga, KULIN Árpád

[Introduction - While examining patients with headache, abnormalities of unknown significance may quite frequently be encountered. In migraine small, subcortical, white matter abnormalities (WMAs) can be visualized by magnetic resonance images. The connection of these WMAs with the migraine is unclear, but some studies report the higher incidence of WMA in migraine. Patients and method - The authors reviewed the MR scans of their new migraine patients younger than 55 years treated in period of 15 months, and compared the data with a control group. Results - The prevalence of WMA was 10.3% among the migraineurs (78 patients without comorbidities such as hypertension, atherosclerotic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, autoimmun disorder or demyelinating disease) and it was 3.1% in the group of controls (32 persons younger then 55 years, and without migraine or other disease mentioned above). There were patients with WMA both below and above the age of 40; all of them were suffering from migraine without aura with 1 or more attack per month in variable times; none of them had smoked, the majority hadn't used oral contraceptive, and only a few of them used triptan or ergotamin. Conclusion - The data presented here shows that there is a relationship between migraine and WMA. The association of WMA and the risk of following stroke is not cleared. There are well known studies analysing the prevalence of silent infarction too, but we need a long prospective study to answer this question exactly.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[NOVEL CELL-BIOLOGICAL IDEAS DEDUCIBLE FROM MORPHOLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS ON “DARK” NEURONS REVISITED]

GALLYAS Ferenc

[The origin, nature and fate of ”dark“ (dramatically shrunken and hyperbasophilic) neurons are century-old problems in both human and experimental neuropathology. Until a few years ago, hardly any cell-biological conclusion had been drawn from their histological investigation. On the basis of light and electron microscopic findings in animal experiments performed during the past few years, my research team has put forward novel ideas concerning 1. the nature of ”dark“ neurons (malfunction of an energystoring gel-structure that is ubiquitously present in all intracellular spaces between the ultrastructural elements), 2. the mechanism of their formation (non-programmed initiation of a whole-cell phase-transition in this gel-structure), 3. their capability of recovery (programmed for some physiological purpose), 4. their death mode (neither necrotic nor apoptotic), and 5. their relationship with the apoptotic cell death (the gel structure in question is programmed for the morphological execution of ontogenetic apoptosis). Based on morphological observations, this paper revisits these ideas in order to bring them to the attention of researchers who are in a position to investigate their validity by means of experimental paradigms other than those used here.]

Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Vinpocetin in neurological diseases]

SZAPÁRY László, KÉSMÁRKY Gábor, TÓTH Kálmán, MISNYOVSZKY Melinda, TÓTH Tímea, BALOGH Ágnes, NAGY Krisztián, NÉMETH György, FEHÉR Gergely

[Introduction - Stroke is the third leading cause of death worldwide (following cardiovascular and cancer mortality) and associated with serious disability for the vast majority of patients. There is no salvage therapy for irreversibly damaged brain areas, improving the circulation of the surrounding hypoperfused territories may be associated with benefitial clinical states. Cerebral hypoperfusion may play a role in the pathogenesis of other kind of neurological diseases, improvement of global circulation may have a preventive effect on these conditions. Aims - The aim of our study was to review the experimental and clinical articles focusing on the role of vinpocetin in different neurological conditions. Results - Vinpocetin appears to have several different mechanisms of action that allow for its antiinflammatory, antioxidant, vasodilating, antiepileptic and neuroprotective activities in experimental conditions. On the other hand, several meta-analysis of the existing studies in acute stroke examining short and long term fatality rates with vinpocetin was unable to assess efficacy. In chronic cerebrovascular patients, vinpocetin improves impaired hemorheological variables, has significant vasodilating properties, improves endothelial dysfunction, neuroimaging studies showed selective increase in cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate, all of which are potentially beneficial in cerebrovascular disease and may improve cognitive functions. Summary - Based on the above mentioned results vinpocetin plays an important role both in basic research and in clinical management of different neurological diseases.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Effect of two month positive airway pressure therapy on the structure of sleep, cognitive function and anxiety]

CSÁBI Eszter, VÁRSZEGI Mária, SEFCSIK Tamás, NÉMETH Dezsõ

[Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder, characterized by repeated episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep, resulting intermittent hypoxia and disruption of the normal sleep pattern, which caused cognitive dysfunction in these patients. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure is the treatment of choice for this disorder. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of short-term positive airway pressure on sleep pattern (polisomnographic measures), cognitive function and anxiety. Twenty four newly diagnosed and previously untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea were evaluated a battery of neuropsychological tests before and after 2 and a half months of the treatment. We focused on working memory, short and long-term episodic memory, executive functions, anxiety and subjective sleepiness. Our results showed that the two and half month of treatment improved the respiration during sleep, sleep pattern and the subjective sleepiness. We found improvement in short- and long-term verbal memory, and complex working memory. Despite of treatment we did not find improvement in visuospatial learning. These results reveal that 2 and a half months of positive airway pressure treatment restored not only the normal respiration during sleep and normal sleep pattern, but also the cognitive functions. Our study suggests that cognitive dysfunction is at least partial reversible in obstructive sleep apnea patients after positive airway pressure treatment.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Mid-term oral isotretinoin therapy causes a predominantly sensory demyelinating neuropathy

ALTUN Yasar, INAN Esra

Aim - The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate whether mid-term treatment with oral isotretinoin may impact peripheral nerve function. Methods - In this study, we included 28 patients with no apparent neurological or neurophysiological findings. The patients received treatment with oral isotretinoin for papulopustular or nodulocystic acne. The patients with normal findings in the first examination were given 1 mg/kg/day oral isotretinoin. Neurological examinations and electroneurographic studies were performed before and 6 months after the onset of isotretinoin treatment. Results - Clinical examinations and electroneurographic evaluations prior to treatment revealed no abnormalities in any of the patients. However, 20 patients (72%) displayed one or more abnormal values in the tested parameters after treatment. Although the mean amplitudes of compound muscle action potential of the ulnar and median nerves did not vary, significant decreases were observed in the mean sensory conduction velocities of median, ulnar, sural, medial plantar, medial dorsal cutaneous, and dorsal sural nerves 6 months after the onset of treatment. Conclusion - Systemic use of isotretinoin may cause electroneurographic changes. Probable electroneurographic alterations may be detected at a much earlier period via dorsal sural nerve tracing when electrophysiological methods used in routine clinical practice cannot detect these changes.

Clinical Neuroscience

A case report of Morvan syndrome

AYTAC Emrah, ACAR Türkan

Morvan syndrome is a rare disease characterized by peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, encephalopathy, dys­autonomia and significant insomnia. The patient, who was included in the present study, was followed-up at our clinics for confusion, myokymia, hyperhidrosis, epileptic seizures, tachycardia, agitation, hypokalemia, and hyponatremia. The cranial MRI of the patient demonstrated hyperintensities at the T2 and FLAIR sections of the medial temporal lobe and insular lobes. Electromyography and neurotransmission examination results were concordant with peripheral nerve hyperreactivity. Contactin-associated protein-like 2 antibodies and leucine-rich glioma inactivated protein 1 antibodies were detected as positive. The patient was diagnosed with Morvan syndrome; intravenous immunoglobulin and corticosteroid treatment was started. Almost full remission was achieved. This very rare syndrome implies challenges in diagnosis and treatment; however, remission can be achieved during the follow-up. In addition, caution is needed in the long-term follow-up of these patients regarding the development of malignancies.