Clinical Neuroscience

[Dear Colleagues!]

RAJNA Péter

SEPTEMBER 30, 2012

Clinical Neuroscience - 2012;65(09-10)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[A prospective study evaluating the clinical characteristics of cluster headache]

ERTSEY Csaba, VESZA Zsófia, BANGÓ Márta, VARGA Tímea, NAGYIDEI Diána, MANHALTER Nóra, BOZSIK György

[Introduction - Although cluster headache (CH) is one of the most severe human pain syndromes, its symptoms and therapeutic possibilities may be suboptimally recognised in current medical practice in Hungary. Aim - To present the clinical characteristics of CH based on a prospective study of patients attending the Headache Service of the Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University. Methods - We collected information about the symptoms, diagnosis and previous treatment of CH patients by filling in a 108-item questionnaire during outpatient visits. Results - In the 5-year period between 2004 and 2008 we obtained data from 78 CH patients (57 males and 21 females; mean age: 44.6±14.6 years). The male:female ratio did not change in subgroups based on disease onset (calendar years). Ninety-three percent considered CH the most severe pain state of their life. The pain was strictly unilateral, affecting the territory of the 1st trigeminal division in all patients. The attacks were accompanied by signs of ipsilateral cranial parasympathetic activation (lactimation 83%, conjunctival injection 67%, rhinorrhea 56%, nasal congestion 43%); less frequently, signs of sympathetic dysfunction (ptosis 48%, miosis 7%) were also present. Two patients had attacks showing the typical localisation, severity and time course of CH attacks, but not accompanied by autonomic phenomena. A considerable part of the patients also observed symptoms that are usually ascribed to migraine (nausea 41%, vomiting 18%, photophobia 68%, phonophobia 58%). This may have been instrumental in the fact that, regardless of the characteristic clinical symptoms, the diagnosis of CH took 10 years on average. At the time of their examination 63% of patients were not using adequate abortive medications and 59% did not have an adequate prophylactic measure. Discussion - Cluster headache is characterised by attacks of devastating pain that warrant an early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Our study underlines that information about the diagnosis and therapy of CH should be emphasized on occasions of neurology specialty training and continuing medical education.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Hungarian neurologists, Gyula Donáth (1849-1944)]

HALÁSZ Péter

Clinical Neuroscience

[Health status and costs of ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary]

PÉNTEK Márta, GULÁCSI László, RÓZSA Csilla, SIMÓ Magdolna, ILJICSOV Anna, KOMOLY Sámuel, BRODSZKY Valentin

[Background and purpose - Data on disease burden of multiple sclerosis from Eastern-Central Europe are very limited. Our aim was to explore the quality of life, resource utilisation and costs of ambulating patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary. Methods - Cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed in two outpatient neurology centres in 2009. Clinical history, health care utilisation in the past 12 months were surveyed, the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the EQ-5D questionnaires were applied. Cost calculation was conducted from the societal perspective. Results - Sixty-eight patients (female 70.6%) aged 38.0 (SD 9.1) with disease duration of 7.8 (SD 6.7) years were involved. Fifty-five (80.9%) had relapsing-remitting form and 52 (76.5%) were taking immunomodulatory drug. The average scores were: Expanded Disability Status Scale 1.9 (SD 1.7), EQ-5D 0.67 (SD 0.28). Mean total cost amounted to 10 902 Euros/patient/year (direct medical 67%, direct nonmedical 13%, indirect costs 20%). Drugs, disability pension and informal care were the highest cost items. Costs of mild (Expanded Disability Status Scale 0-3.5) and moderate (Expanded Disability Status Scale 4.0-6.5) disease were 9 218 and 17 634 Euros/patient/year respectively (p<0.01), that is lower than results from Western European countries. Conclusion - Our study provides current inputs for policy making and contributes to understanding variation of costof- illness of multiple sclerosis in Europe.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurosciences and artificial intelligence]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Role of the intraoperative electrical brain stimulation in conserving the speech and language function in neurosurgical operations of awake patients]

ERÕSS Loránd, FEKETE Gábor, ENTZ László, FABÓ Dániel, BORBÉLY Csaba, KOZÁK Lajos Rudolf, ANDREJKOVICS Mónika, CZIRJÁK Sándor, FEDORCSÁK Imre, NOVÁK László, BOGNÁR László

[Aim of the study - To summarize the results gained with awake craniotomies, which were performed in either low grade glioma patients or epilepsy surgical patients whose tumor or epileptogenic zone, was in the vicinity of eloquent, mostly language, cortices. Patient selection and methods - In our retrospective study we selected 16 patients who were operated awake between 1999-2011 at the Neurosurgical Department of MÁV Kórház Budapest, or at the National Institute of Neurosciences in Budapest, or at the Neurosurgical Department of the University of Debrecen in Debrecen. In the presurgical evaluation if it was possible we performed functional magnetic resonance imaging, tractography and detailed neuropsychological testing. At the National Institute of Neurosciences all patients were operated with the aid of MR guided neuronavigation. Results - Anesthesia was carried out without complications in all of the 16 cases. Monitoring of sleep deepness has significantly contributed to the safety of anesthesia during the superficial anesthezied states of the operation. The intraoperative neuropsychological tasks used for testing language were sensitive enough to judge the little disturbances in speech during stimulation. Stimulation evoked seizures could be adequately managed during surgery and did not influence the outcome of the procedures. The use of neuronavigation helped significantly by planning the optimal place for the craniotomy and by intraoperative orientation. Conclusions - Awake craniotomies require well practiced surgical teams, which requires the cooperation of neuro-anesthesiologits, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologist and electrophysiologists. It has two goals, first to reduce the time of surgery to minimize surgical complications, secondly the detailed intraoperative mapping of cognitive and motor functions to avoid any neurological deficit. The intraoperative anatomical data provided by the neuronavigation and the functional data provided by awake intraoperative stimulation of the patient together serve the safety of the patient which is essential in the neurologically minimal invasive neurosurgical approach of the 21st century.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Family medicine as a career. Medical students’ attitudes and vocational choice motivations]

MOHOS András, VARGA Albert, MARKÓ-KUCSERA Mária, KALABAY László, TORZSA Péter

[INTRODUCTION - The large number of vacant general practices is a burning issue in Hungary. The entering of new colleagues into the general practitioner speciality training does not pose a real solution to the human resources crisis in this field. Our aim is to assess medical students’ attitudes and knowledge about general practice. SAMPLE AND METHOD - Cross-sectional survey with self-completed questionnaires at the University of Szeged, with the participation of 94 fourth and fifth year medical students in 2016 and 78 first and fourth year medical students in 2017. RESULTS - In 2016 1% of students planned for sure, and 16% planned probably to work as a general practitioner in the future. In 2017 3.9% of first-year students planned definitely to be a general practitioner, and 15.4% planned that probably. Among fourth-year students 0% of students planned for sure, and 19.2% planned probably to work as a general practitioner in the future. Whatever the presence of family medicine in undergraduate training influenced the medical students’ opinion about the profession positively (0.4-1.3 on a scale based on the direction and strength of the effects of certain factors ranging from -5 to +5). Those who were interested in family medicine considered the situation of healthcare significantly worse (p=0.027), than those who were not interested. To make the profession more attractive the following factors may play the most important role: the more intense presentation (I: 37%) of general practice in undergraduate training, improving the prestige of family medicine (IV: 31%), high-quality work (IV: 39%). CONCLUSIONS - Few medical students plan to work as general practitioner in the future. The most effective way to raise interest in family medicine is to increase the students’ knowledge and awareness of this specialisation, and the more intensive presentation of family medicine in undergraduate training is a key issue.]

Ca&Bone

[Dear Readers and Colleagues!]

HORVÁTH CSABA

Ca&Bone

[Dear Colleagues and Readers!]

HORVÁTH CSABA

Hypertension and nephrology

[The beginnings and difficulties of peritoneal dialysis at the end of the last century. Part II. Hungarian experiences]

KARÁTSON András

[In Part I, I summarised the beginnings, the theoretical background and the international experiences of peritoneal dialysis. Hungarian publications related to peritoneal dialysis in the 1950s were focusing on the role of the method in the treatment of chronic renal disorders. The first dialysis centres were established in the medical universities of Hungary (Szeged in 1955, Budapest in 1960, Pécs in 1964, Debrecen in 1970) and in Miskolc in 1968. Despite the restricted hemodialysis capacities the intermittent technique of peritoneal dialysis did not spread in accordance with the demand. A survey conducted at the beginning of the 1970’s in the territory of the five counties with 1.5 million inhabitants revealed that considering the numbers of patients with renal diseases requiring dialysis, developing of a network of care and increasing the dialysis capacities is necessary and so is the development of a system of szatellite peritoneal dialysis, which was implemented with our support in 10 units of the county hospitals. A devoted and enthusiastic organiser of the nation-wide system of peritoneal dialysis was professor Taraba, who, due to his untimely death, was deprived of seeing the nation-wide spread of CAPD. At the beginning of the 1980’s the first reports on the favourable effects of CAPD appeared in Hungary. Solutions prepared in pharmacies and the lack of up-to-date equipment resulted in the frequent occurrence of peritonitis. In addition, the unfavourable memories of dialysis performed with bottled solutions (long treatment times, frequently peritonitis) were still vivid among patients and colleagues supervising the treatment. As a consequence, our survey conducted in 1991 revealed that the spread of CAPD all over the world in Hungary resulted in a significant increase of those treated with the intermittent method (more than 10% of the dialysis patients), while those treated with CAPD remained under 2%. Several reports on CAPD and the consequences that followed from them as well as the further training organised in the Szent Margit Hospital, Budapest and in Gánt, and also the guidelines issued by the Society of Hungarian Nephrologists the number of those treated with dialysis has exceeded 6000 in the past decade. 10% of them received CAPD/APD treatment.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Dear Reader]

KÉKES Ede, ALFÖLDI Sándor