Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

MAY 20, 2007

Clinical Neuroscience - 2007;60(05-06)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[DIETARY ASPECTS OF EPILEPSY]

KOZÁK Norbert, CSIBA László

[The ketogenic diet has been used long for the treatment of epilepsy. The high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet creates ketosis. Although the exact mechanism of action is unknown the results are consistent. Ten percent of the patients who start the diet become seizure free, 50% experiences 50% seizure reduction. The diet is hardly tolerable but also effective in therapyresistent patients. Trials are under way with new methods, like the Atkins diet, low-glycaemic-index treatment, polyunsaturated fatty acids, to make the diet more tolerable and widely available.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGENITAL CATARACTS FACIAL DYSMORPHISM NEUROPATHY SYNDROME - FIRST HUNGARIAN CASE REPORT]

SISKA Éva, NEUWIRTH Magdolna, REBECCA Gooding, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[The congenital cataracts facial dysmorphism neuropathy (CCFDN) syndrome (OMIM 604168) is a recently described autosomal recessive developmental disorder. It is almost completely restricted to an endogamous group of the European Vlax Roma population, called the Rudari. The CCFDN syndrome is a complex phenotype involving multiple systems, characterized by facial dysmorphism, congenital cataracts, microcorneae, delayed early motor and intellectual development, hypogonadotrop hypogonadism, hypomyelination of the peripheral nervous system, and serious complications related to general anaesthesia. This disorder is caused by a homozygous mutation of the carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (CTDP1) gene, localized to the 18q23 region. Authors present one genetically identified case in a large Roma family. The case documents that the CCFDN mutation is present also in the Hungarian Roma population. Underlie of antropomorphological data the authors presume that the CCFDN mutation reached Hungary as a result of emigration of Vlax Gypsies in the 18th century. The paper calls attention to the fact that molecular genetic diagnostics can replace invasive methods and makes possible the identification of heterozygotes without clinical symptoms. The introduction of the genetic screening enables us to perform genetic counselling and prevention in this high-risk population.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[100 years of riddle… X. Jubilee Alzheimer’s disease congress on the 100th anniversary of disease description]

Clinical Neuroscience

[THE PREVALENCE OF WHITE MATTER ABNORMALITIES ON MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGES IN MIGRAINE]

TÓTH Marianna, KUNDRA Olga, KULIN Árpád

[Introduction - While examining patients with headache, abnormalities of unknown significance may quite frequently be encountered. In migraine small, subcortical, white matter abnormalities (WMAs) can be visualized by magnetic resonance images. The connection of these WMAs with the migraine is unclear, but some studies report the higher incidence of WMA in migraine. Patients and method - The authors reviewed the MR scans of their new migraine patients younger than 55 years treated in period of 15 months, and compared the data with a control group. Results - The prevalence of WMA was 10.3% among the migraineurs (78 patients without comorbidities such as hypertension, atherosclerotic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, autoimmun disorder or demyelinating disease) and it was 3.1% in the group of controls (32 persons younger then 55 years, and without migraine or other disease mentioned above). There were patients with WMA both below and above the age of 40; all of them were suffering from migraine without aura with 1 or more attack per month in variable times; none of them had smoked, the majority hadn't used oral contraceptive, and only a few of them used triptan or ergotamin. Conclusion - The data presented here shows that there is a relationship between migraine and WMA. The association of WMA and the risk of following stroke is not cleared. There are well known studies analysing the prevalence of silent infarction too, but we need a long prospective study to answer this question exactly.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Determining the term of schizencephaly]

KENÉZ József, LEEL-ŐSSY Lóránt

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