Clinical Neuroscience

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JULY 30, 2012

Clinical Neuroscience - 2012;65(07-08)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Are oppressive dreams indicators in bereavement?]

PUREBL György, PILLING János, KONKOLY THEGE Barna, BÓDIZS Róbert, KOPP Mária

[Objectives - It is widely believed that oppressive dreams are frequent in bereavement - despite the lack of scientific investigations of the subject. The aims of our study were the analysis of dream quality as well as the correlates of oppressive dreams in bereavement. Method - Participants with (N=473) and without bereavement were compared upon the database of a national representative study (Hungarostudy Epidemiological Panel Survey 2006, N=4329). Dream contents were assessed with the Dream Quality Questionnaire (DQQ). Depressive symptoms (BDI-S) and the presence anxiety were also investigated. Results - Oppressive dreams occurred significantly higher frequency in the first year of bereavement (men: F=17.525, p<0.001, women: F=8.291, p=0.004). Oppressive dreams were significantly associated with anxiety (F=37.089, p<0.001) and with depressive symptoms (F=50.562, p<0.001). Discussion - Oppressive dreams are significantly more frequent in the first year of bereavement, and may act as indicators of bereavement-linked mental health consequences like depression and anxiety. These are often masked by the symptoms of grief and therefore remain untreated. Our preliminary results could be a starting point for the development of further research aiming to clarify the relationship amongst dream contents, anxiety, and depression in bereavement.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Editorial message]

TAJTI János, RAJNA Péter

Clinical Neuroscience

[Endoscopic, posterior transseptal pituitary surgery - Learning curve of the surgical technique and equipment in 61 operations]

BELLA Zsolt, FÜLÖP Béla, CSAJBÓK Éva, MAGONY Sándor, VALKUSZ Zsuzsa, HERCZEGH Szilvia, JÓRI József, BODOSI Mihály, CZIGNER Jenő, BARZÓ Pál

[Introduction - The removal of hypophyseal tumor by transsphenoidal pituitary surgery using microsurgical instruments was first performed over 100 years ago. Operating techniques for this surgery are constantly being renewed, first by using a microscope and later on with the use of an endoscop. The authors provide an overview of the minimal invasive posterior transseptal-transsphenoidal aproach with the combined utilization of classical techniques with the assistance of the endoscop. Method - Sixty-one patients (33 female, 28 male, 21-84 yrs) were treated for sellar region tumor resection using an endonasal transsphenoidal aproach with the help of an endoscop. Follow ups were performed within 2-21 months. Results - Total tumor resection was successful in 91.8%, and partial resection in 8.2% of the patients. The rate of complications using the endoscop method was not higher compared to that of the classical microscopic method. There was no major bleeding in any of the cases. Adverse events such as minor epistaxis occurred in 4.9%, transitional diabetes insipidus in 6.5%, inraoperative CSF leak in 16.67%, postoperative CSF leak in 11.5% and meningitis in 8.2% of the patients. After the operation the pathological hormonal production stoped in all patients except in two patients who were acromegalic. However their GH level normalized and they did not require further treatment, the IGF-1 still remained high. Conclusion - The success of the surgical treatment is based on both, the proficient pre- and postoperative endocrinological care, and the minimal invasive surgical technique. The endoscop was used partially or continuously during the operation for better visualization of the operation field in multiple angles (30°, 45°). It was useful in differentiating between normal and tumorous glandular tissue, and also offered an enhanced view of the intrasellar (via hydroscopy) and parasellar region. Moreover the endoscopic method is able to decrease the operating time, reduce blood loss. In different stages of the surgery, depending on the anatomical and pathological situation, switching back and forth from microscope to endoscop technique, gives us the benefit of a clearer view in each situation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Diagnosis and therapy of mitochondrial diseases]

PÁL Endre

[Mitochondrial diseases are a significant part of neuromuscular diseases. Majority of them is multisystemic disorder. The diagnosis can be established in more and more cases. Beyond the routine neurological examination imaging methods (MRI and MR-spectroscopy) and electrophysiology (EMG, ENG, EEG, evoked potential tests) might be helpful in setting the diagnosis. Raised blood lactate level supports the diagnosis. Muscle biopsy demonstrates mitochondrial abnormalities in the majority of cases. The positivity of genetic tests is low, because the amount of mitochondrial DNA alterations is different in tissues. Therefore other tissue than blood (mainly muscle) is necessary for genetic tests. The other reason is that the respiratory chain is under double -mitochondrial and nuclear - genetic control, and testing the nuclear genes are available only in selected laboratories. The treatment is limited, mainly symptomatic.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Recommendations for a brief international cognitive assessment for multiple sclerosis]

BENCSIK Krisztina

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