Clinical Neuroscience

[Congress calendar]

JULY 20, 2011

Clinical Neuroscience - 2011;64(07-08)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Pseudo abducens palsy]

RÓZSA Anikó, KOVÁCS Krisztina, SZILVÁSSY Ildikó, BOÓR Krisztina, GÁCS Gyula

[In this study, we present two cases of different eye movement disorders with variable case histories but with the same end stage; abduction paresis of one of the eyes, which ceased when the other eye was covered. Our differential diagnosis is that either the ocular form of myasthenia gravis, convergence spasm or ocular myotonia could explain the symptoms. However, we hypothesize that the clinical picture corresponds to pseudo abducens palsy or focal dystonia of the extraocular muscle, which in turn could be the result of impaired inhibition of the tonic resting activity of the antagonistic medial rectus muscle. We offer an explanation for the patomechanism of pseudoabducens palsy and the variants of internuclear ophthalmoplegia.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Recent changes in the paradigm of limbic encephalitis]

ILLÉS Zsolt

[In the recent years, novel antibodies associated with limbic encephalitis have been described, which target such extracellular receptors or proteins that have been already indicated in the pathogenesis of hereditary or degenerative diseases. In a number of cases, where pathogenic role of antibodies generated against the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) had been presumed, antibodies against a trans-synaptic scaffolding protein, LGI1 were indicated. Antibody response against NMDA-receptors has been suggested as a major cause of limbic encephalitis especially in young females, resulting in a typical clinical syndrome sometimes triggered by an ovarian teratoma. Antibodies against other receptors essential in synaptic transmission and plasticity (AMPA and GABAB receptors) have been also indicated, partially elicited by paraneoplastic processes. Such antibodies against surface proteins result in severe but potentially treatable diseases due to reversible internalization of the antigens crosslinked by the bivalent antibodies. In contrast, the rare classical onconeural antibodies reacting with intracellular targets (anti-Hu, anti-Ta/Ma2, anti- CV2/CRMP5) may elicit additional symptoms beside limbic encephalitis and the prognosis of such syndromes is poor.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Unilateral ptosis associated with paramedian thalamic infarction]

TOPCULAR B, YANDIM-KUSCU D, ÇOLAK M, BEHREM N, KARAGOZ-SAKALLI N, GUL G, SUTLAS NP, KIRBAS D

[The paramedian artery arises from P1 segment of posterior cerebral artery and supplies a variable extent of thalamus but usually the dorsomedian, median, internal medullary lamina and the intralaminar nuclei. The typical clinical picture of unilateral paramedian thalamic infarctions consist of arousal and memory disorders, language or visuospatial disorders depending on the side of the lesion accompanied with gaze palsies and sensory-motor deficits. Ipsilateral ptosis associated with paramedian thalamic infarctions has been rarely reported. We report a 31 years old patient presenting with unilateral ptosis and right sided facial numbness associated with right paramedian thalamic infarction.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Modeling of human movements, neuroprostheses]

LACZKÓ József

[Modeling of human movements became very important as modern methods in informatics and engeniering are available to discern human movement characteristics that were hidden before. The construction of models of neural control and mechanical execution of human movements helps the diagnosis of movement disorders and predicts the outcome of clinical intervention and medical rehabilitation. Here I present methods for recording kinematic and muscle activity patterns. Measurements can be compared with predicted movement patterns based on mathematical models. There are an infinity of different muscle activity patterns or joint rotation patterns to perform a given motor task. I present the main approaches that are used to find such solutions from the infinity of choices that might be employed by the central nervous system. I present a practical application of movement modeling: In rehabilitation of spinal cord injured patients we develop and apply artificially controlled neuroprostheses to generate active cycling lower limb movements in the patients of the National Institute for Medical Rehabilitation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The brain that changes itself - Norman Doidge]

HALÁSZ Péter

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