Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

AUGUST 20, 2002

Clinical Neuroscience - 2002;55(07-08)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[The molecular genetic control of bony developmental malformations affecting the craniocervical junction and the cervical spine]

DÁVID Károly, KASÓ Gábor, THOROGOOD Peter V, STEVENS John M, CROCKARD H Alan

[In this review a new interpretation of the origin of bony developmental malformations affecting the craniocervical junction and the cervical spine is presented based on recent advances in the understanding of embryonic development of the spine and its molecular genetic control. Radiographs, CT and MRI scans or CT myelograms of patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome were used for demonstration. Detailed clinical and radiologial analysis of these patients was published earlier [David KM, Stevens JM, Thorogood P, Crockard HA. The dysmorphic cervical spine in Klippel-Feil syndrome: interpretations from developmental biology. Neurosurg Focus 1999;6(6):1.]. Homeotic transformation due to mutations or disturbed expression of Hox genes is a possible mechanism responsible for C1 assimilation. Notochordal defects and/or signalling problems, that result in reduced or impaired Pax-1 gene expression, may underlie vertebral fusions. This, together with asymmetrical distribution of paraxial mesoderm cells and a possible lack of communication across the embryonic mid-line, could cause the asymmetrical fusion patterns. The wide and flattened shape of the fused vertebral bodies, their resemblance to the embryonic cartilaginous vertebrae and the process of progressive bony fusion with age suggest that the fusions occur before or, at the latest, during chondrification of vertebrae. The authors suggest that the aforementioned mechanisms are likely to be, at least in part, responsible for the origin of the bony developmental malformations affecting the craniocervical junction and the cervical spine.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Application of kinematic parameters for the assessment of impairments due to central motoneuron damage]

FAZEKAS Gábor, FEHÉR Miklós, KOCSIS László, STEFANIK Györgyi, BOROS Zsuzsanna, JURÁK Mihály

[Evidence based medicine requires objective methods for the assessment of status of the patients. The method described by the authors makes it possible to assess motoric impairment of patients in an objective way. It is based on three-dimensional motion analysis. Authors present the case history of two patients with spastic hemiparesis due to central nervous system damage. Changes in motoric impairment were followed by three-dimensional motion analysis. This method can be adapted for the assessment of motor impairment arising from other reasons as well.]

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[Percutaneous procedure for treatment of diseased vertebral bodies with different etiology: vertebroplasty]

KASÓ Gábor, STEFANITS János, KÖVÉR Ferenc, HUDVÁGNER Sándor, DÓCZI Tamás

[Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a radiologically guided invasive technique consisting of the injection of surgical cement into the diseased vertebral body. The procedure results in immediate pain relief and strengthening of the bone due to the polymerization process of the filling material hardening the vertebral body and preventing further collapse. This method is suitable for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures and of osteolytic vertebral body metastases without neurological signs, in multiple appearance as well. Authors present technical details of the procedure performed by bi-directional fluoroscopy and combined CT-fluoroscopy control as well as short-term experience obtained by treatment of 17 patients.]

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[Alagútszindrómák és egyéb kompressziós mononeuropathiák]

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