Clinical Neuroscience

[Comparative analysis of the full and shortened versions of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory]

ÁDÁM Szilvia1, DOMBRÁDI Viktor2, MÉSZÁROS Veronika3, BÁNYAI Gábor2, NISTOR Anikó4, BÍRÓ Klára2

JULY 30, 2020

Clinical Neuroscience - 2020;73(07-08)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.73.0231

[Background – The two free-to-use versions of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI) have been increasingly utilised to assess the prevalence of burnout among human service workers. The OLBI has been developed to overcome some of the psychometric and conceptual limitations of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the gold standard of burnout measures. There is a lack of data on the structural validity of the Mini Oldenburg Burnout Inventory and the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory in Hungary. Purpose – To assess the structural validity of the Hungarian versions of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory and the Mini-Oldenburg Burnout Inventory. Methods – We enrolled 564 participants (196 healthcare workers, 104 nurses and 264 clinicians) in three cross-sectional surveys. In our analysis we assessed the construct validity of the instruments using confirmatory factor analysis and internal consistency using coefficient Cronbach’s α. Results – We confirmed the two-dimensional structure (exhaustion and disengagement) of the Mini-Oldenburg Inventory and a shortened version of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory Internal consistency coefficient confirmed the reliability of the instruments. The burnout appeared more than a 50 percent of the participants in every subsample. The prevalence of exhaustion was above 54.5% in each of the subsamples and the proportion of disengaged clinicians was particularly high (92%). Conclusions – Our findings provide support for the construct validity and reliability of the Hungarian versions of the Mini-Oldenburg Burnout Inventory and a shortened version of the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory in the assessment of burnout among clinicians and nurses in Hungary.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, Egészségügyi Közszolgálati Kar, Egészségügyi Menedzserképzô Központ, Budapest
  2. Debreceni Egyetem, Népegészségügyi Kar, Egészségügyi Menedzsment és Minôségirányítási Tanszék, Debrecen
  3. Károli Gáspár Református Egyetem, Pszichológiai Intézet, Általános Lélektani és Módszertani Tanszék, Budapest
  4. Semmelweis Egyetem, Mentális Egészségtudományok Doktori Iskola, Budapest

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Clinical Neuroscience

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