Clinical Neuroscience

[Cerebral radiocirculography]

PÁLVÖLGYI Richárd1, HERNÁDY Tibor1

NOVEMBER 01, 1967

Clinical Neuroscience - 1967;20(11)

[The authors give a brief overview of the different methodologies for the study of the cerebral circulation with radioactive isotopes. They discuss in more detail Eichhorn's radiocirculography method, which, in addition to its simplicity, provides valuable data on the cerebral circulation.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. BOTE Radiológiai Klinika

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Study of brain surface cooling in patients with epilepsy]

PÁSZTOR Emil, TOMKA Imre

[In patients with epilepsy during surgical exploration, surface cooling of the brain was performed with cold physiological kitchen salt during ECOG registration. 1. A gradual decrease in the amplitude of ECOG activity with insignificant or mild changes in frequency was observed after local surface cooling. No progressive development of slow waves was observed. 2. One to two minutes of brain surface cooling can temporarily suspend the electrical activity of a highly active epileptic focus. 3. The cooling test provides the possibility to determine the primary or secondary nature of the abnormal electrical activity in the opposite homologous area 4. Very brief (10-20 sec) cooling causes a transient increase in epileptiform activity, exclusively at active points. 5. Short brain surface cooling during ECOG could be considered as a new functional electrographic test. It is a very simple and harmless way of amplifying epileptiform activity of uncertain value and thus facilitating localisation of areas of increased excitability. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Data on the role of psychic induction in the generation of compulsions ]

HAITS Géza, PISZTORA Ferenc

[In five case studies, the authors analyse the role of psychic induction in the generation of compulsions. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Apparently sex-linked inheritance of Huntington's chorea ]

LÉNÁRD Lili

[The analysis of the family tree does not overturn the classic theory that the dominant inheritance of an autosomal gene is responsible for the transmission of Huntington's disease. Such a distribution of the sexes could be produced by the random dispersal of an autosomal dominant gene. Actio of modifier genes is also possible. A simple factor localised in the ivari chromosome, as in the case of haemophilia or colour blindness, is not indicated by the pedigree. However, the exclusivity of females and the relatively high number of males with no survival, makes it conceivable that the same gene that causes chorea in females has a lethal effect in males. It is likely that in this family, sex represents a genetic background that influences the physiologic circumstances of the action of the involved genes in profound ways. However, our observations are not sufficient to unambiguously clarify the inheritance pathway in this family. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Treatment of childhood organic cerebral lesions and cerebral dysfunction with Mydeton]

KISS Zoltán

[Mydetone has been tested - at an average daily dose of 0.3 gr (3 x 2 tbl) - in 120 children with organic cerebral damage and cerebral function disorders. 21 patients (18%) became symptom-free or improved to a great extent, 87 patients (72%) improved, 12 patients (10%) unchanged. Experience to date has shown that Mydetone is a useful aid in natal and postnatal forms of aperture. It has been shown to be effective in epileptics when used as an adjuvant. And in paroxysmal atypical seizures, it seems to have a particularly good effect. Very useful in memory and attention disorders, learning problems. It is also an effective and useful aid - for emotional and vegetative symptoms of neurotic reactions that are not too acute, as well as for headaches. In cases of enuresis nocturnes, no significant effect was observed. With regard to the mechanism of action of Mydetone, it also draws attention to temporal lobe function changes inextricably linked to the formatio reticularis, based on the effect observed in memory disorders and electrophysiological observations. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Congress of the German Neurosurgical Society 1967]

CSANAKY Artúr

[Author reports on the 1967 Congress of the German Neurosurgical Society.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[Is the implementation of Vojta therapy associated with faster gross motor development in children with cerebral palsy? ]

SANZ-MENGIBAR Jose Manuel , MENENDEZ-PARDIÑAS Monica , SANTONJA-MEDINA Fernando

[Vojta therapy has been reported as clinically beneficial for strength, movement and gross motor activities in individual cases and is being included within the second of three levels of evidence in interventions for cerebral palsy. The goal of this study is to understand the effect of Vojta therapy on the gross motor function. Our clinical trial followed a one group, pre-post design to quantify rates of changes in GMFM-88 after a two-months period undergoing Vojta therapy. A total of 16 patients were recruited. Post-intervention acceleration rates of GMFM-88-items acquisition (0.005; p<0.001) and Locomotor Stages (1.063; p<0.0001) increased significatively following Vojta the­rapy intervention. In this study, Vojta therapy has shown to accelerate the acquisition of GMFM-88-items and Loco­motor Stages in children with cerebral palsy younger than 18 months. Because functional training was not utilised, and other non-Vojta therapy intervention did not influence the outcome, Vojta therapy seems to activate the postural control required to achieve uncompleted GMFM-88-items. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

TOLVAJ Balázs, HAHN Katalin, NAGY Zsuzsanna, VADVÁRI Árpád, CSOMOR Judit, GELPI Ellen, ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Mentalizing deficit among patients with traumatic brain injury ]

TAMÁS Viktória, BÜKI András, HEROLD Róbert

[Mentalization or theory of mind as an aspect of our social cognition, is our ability to infer mental states of others (intentions, desires, thoughts, emotions) and to predict their behavior accordingly. This function significantly affects our participation and orientation in the social world and plays an important role in conversational situations, social interactions, social integ­ration and adaptation. The brain regions that serve as the basis for mind-reading function can be damaged as a consequence of traumatic brain injury, which frequently occurs among the younger population. Traumatic brain injury can cause focal or diffuse cerebral injuries, often leading to theory of mind deficit. In this topic such publications were researched that compared theory of mind ability between traumatic brain injury patients and control subjects (comparative case-control studies). We searched for the studies in the following internet based/online databases: PubMed, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, APA PsycNET (PsycARTICLES) and EBSCO Host. The search was performed using the following key word combinations: theory of mind or mentalizing or social cognition AND traumatic brain injury or head/brain injury or diffuse axonal injury. Based on the results of the included and processed studies (21 pc), traumatic brain injury often leads to mentalization deficit with different severity. With this present review we aim to draw attention to the fact that the appearance and severity of mind reading dysfunction can considerably affect the outcome of the disease, the length of rehabilitation time and the prognosis of traumatic brain injury patients. Besides this, with this review, we aim to take sides in whether theory of mind ability is domain-specific or domian-general based on studies including traumatic brain injury patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The Expanded Disability Status Scale scoring in patients with multiple sclerosis]

FÜVESI Judit

[Gait disturbance is a major symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was first used in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis for the assessment of disability, however it has become more and more widely used in clinical practice as well. Nowadays its use is essential in application of the new diagnostic criteria, the new clinical form classification and in monitoring the efficacy of therapies. EDSS is based on a standardised neurological examination, but focuses on those symptoms that are frequent in multiple sclerosis. Based on the examination it assesses seven functional systems: visual, brainstem, pyramidal, cerebellar, sensory, bowel-bladder and cerebral functions. EDSS scores can be determined based on the scores given in the functional systems and on testing the walking distance. In newer versions the “Ambulation score” has been added. This chapter clarifies the scores based on the maximal walking distance and the need for a walking aid to walk this distance. The Neurostatus/EDSS training method improves the reproducibility of the standardised neurological examination that forms the basis of the EDSS scoring. Of the tests assessing walking, the Timed-25 Foot Walk Test and the self-administered 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale are suitable for routine evaluation of walking performance. An increase of more than 20% in the Timed-25 Foot Walk may be considered a significant change in gait. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

The effects of 30 Hz, 50 Hz AND 100 Hz continuous theta burst stimulation via transcranial magnetic stimulation on the electrophysiological parameters in healthy individuals

OZDEMIR Zeynep, ACAR Erkan, SOYSAL Aysun

Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a non-invasive procedure that uses robust magnetic fields to create an electrical current in the cerebral cortex. Dual stimulation consists of administering subthre­shold conditioning stimulation (CS), then suprathreshold test stimulation (TS). When the interstimulus interval (ISI) is 1-6 msec, the motor evoked potential (MEP) decreases in amplitude; this decrease is termed “short interval intracortical inhibition” (SICI); when the ISI is 7-30 msec, an increase in MEP amplitude occurs, termed “short interval intracortical facilitation” (SICF). Continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS), often applied at a frequency of 50 Hz, has been shown to decrease cortical excitability. The primary objective is to determine which duration of cTBS achieves better inhibition or excitation. The secondary objective is to compare 50 Hz cTBS to 30 Hz and 100 Hz cTBS. The resting motor threshold (rMT), MEP, SICI, and SICF were studied in 30 healthy volunteers. CS and TS were administered at 80%-120% and 70%-140% of rMT at 2 and 3-millisecond (msec) intervals for SICI, and 10- and 12-msec intervals for SICF. Ten individuals in each group received 30, 50, or 100 Hz, followed by administration of rMT, MT-MEP, SICI, SICF immediately and at 30 minutes. Greater inhibition was achieved with 3 msec than 2 msec in SICI, whereas better facilitation occurred at 12 msec than 10 msec in SICF. At 30 Hz, cTBS augmented inhibition and suppressed facilitation, while 50 Hz yielded less inhibition and greater inter-individual variability. At 100 Hz, cTBS provided slight facilitation in MEP amplitudes with less interindividual variability. SICI and SICF did not differ significantly between 50 Hz and 100 Hz cTBS. Our results suggest that performing SICI and SICF for 3 and 12 msec, respectively, and CS and TS at 80%-120% of rMT, demonstrate safer inhibition and facilitation. Recently, TBS has been used in the treatment of various neurological diseases, and we recommend preferentially 30 Hz over 50 Hz cTBS for better inhibition with greater safety and less inter-individual variability.