Clinical Neuroscience

Cerebral cavernous malformation type 1 with retinal blood vessel tortuosity and KRIT1 gene mutation

KALMÁR Tibor1, MARÓTI Zoltán1, VADVÁRI Árpád2, HALMOSI Ágnes3, KÁLOVITS Ferenc4,5, KÁLMÁN Bernadette5,6

JULY 30, 2019

Clinical Neuroscience - 2019;72(07-08)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.72.0273

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) represent a relatively rare and heterogeneous clinical entity with mutations identified in three genes. Both sporadic and familial forms have been reported. We present a young female patient with episodic paresthesia and headaches, but without acute neurological deficits. Her mother had a hemorrhaged cavernoma surgically removed 21 years ago. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple cavernous malformations in the size of a few millimeters and the ophthalmologic exam detected retinal blood vessel tortuosity in the proband. Targeted exome sequencing analysis identified a nonsense mutation in exon 16 of the KRIT1 gene, which resulted in a premature stop codon and a truncated protein underlying the abnormal development of cerebral and retinal blood vessels. This mutation with pathogenic significance has been reported before. Our case points to the importance of a thorough clinical and molecular work up despite the uncertain neurological complaints, since life style recommendations, imaging monitoring and genetic counseling may have major significance in the long term health of the patient.

AFFILIATIONS

  1. University of Szeged, Institute of Pediatrics and Pediatric Health Center, Szeged Hungary
  2. Markusovszky University Teaching Hospital, Department of Radiology, Szombathely
  3. Markusovszky University Teaching Hospital, Department of Ophthalmology, Szombathely
  4. Markusovszky University Teaching Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Szombathely
  5. University of Pécs, School of Medicine, School of Graduate Studies, Pécs
  6. Department of Molecular Pathology of the Markusovszky University Teaching Hospital, Szombathely

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