Clinical Neuroscience

[Centronuclear myopathy ]

GÁTI István1, CZOPF József1, TROMBITÁS Károly1

JUNE 01, 1985

Clinical Neuroscience - 1985;38(06)

[The authors describe the medical history of a mother and daughter with centronuclear myopathy. The mother's disease began with clinical signs of neural isomatrophy, and later clinical, electrophysiological, and histological examinations confirmed myopathy. In her daughter, histopathological examination demonstrated centronuclear myopathy with type I muscle fibre hypotrophy. Sural biopsy showed severe degeneration of the peripheral nerve. Clinical, electrophysiological and histological data of both patients documented peripheral nerve damage in centronuclear myopathy. ]

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  1. Pécsi Orvostudományi Egyetem Ideg-és Elmeklinikája és Központi Elektronmikroszkópos Laboratóriuma

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