Clinical Neuroscience

[Asymptomatic skull-base destructios]

VÁRNAI György1, LIPCSEY Attila1, AMBRÓZY György1

JULY 01, 1967

Clinical Neuroscience - 1967;20(07)

[Authors describe two patients in whom extensive skull base destruction was detected. No syndromes of cerebral nerve injury, as expected from the location of the destructios, were observed in these patients. Possible reasons for the absence of symptoms are discussed. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Budapesti Orvostudományi Egyetem Radiológiai Klinika és Neurológiai Klinika

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Clinical Neuroscience

[The problems of angiographic diagnosis in relation to retrograde vertebral circulation]

DEÁK Gy., GORÁCZ I., JUHÁSZ J., PÁSZTOR E.

[Detailed angiographic evidence is provided of the retrograde vertebral circulation with respect to the possibility of a possibility of a sham,,subclavian steal" syndrome is discussed. It is emphasized that elective vertebral arteriography may also normally frequently fill the reciprocal vertebral artery retrogradely. The cause of this must be sought primarily in mechanical factors. By analyzing the angiograms of a patient with true and one with apparent "subclavian steal" syndrome, it is concluded that in case of atypical clinical symptoms or lack of angiographic evidence, one must always think of the apparent "subclavian steal'' syndrome. The differentiation of the two syndromes is only possible by serial aortography, with the help of the Gidlund syringe from the brachial artery or, in the case of occlusion of the subclavian artery, from the common carotid artery. carotis communis.]

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[An interesting case of a family with progressive dystrophia musculorum with dominant inheritance]

MOLNÁR Sándor

[The author presented a case of a family with autosomal dominant inheritance of shoulder girdle typos with DMP, which is different from the average in several respects. Finally, some hereditary literature on this type of DMP was presented. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Indicative guidelines and methodological dilemmas in the treatment of "alcoholism'']

KARDOS György

[My report in issue 17 of the Medical Journal of 1961 (102: 769-776) summarized the experiments in the treatment of chronic alcoholism with drugs. It dealt with the expected therapeutic results, side-effects, contra-indications and complications on the basis of literature data and our own 580 case histories. The latter have been discussed in detail elsewhere (Medical Education, 37.103-119, 1962) in connection with our analysis of 33 cases of antaethyl-psychosis and alcohol withdrawal syndrome. The same applies to the socio-psychological interactions modifying the intrinsic effects of drug treatments (Psychological Studies, VII: 295-302, 1965). We must now deal with the general guidelines and methodological dilemmas of active withdrawal treatments from the point of view of a therapeutic plan aimed at resolving the pluricausal alcoholism syndromes. I would like to emphasise the latter with particular emphasis, because rejecting them could lead to fundamental errors of approach and practice, i.e. the notion that alcoholism is a monocausal disease entity and that this erroneous and even harmful view results in a barren effort to provide uniform, routine care for 'alcoholics'. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

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[Based on 60 cases treated in our child psychiatry unit, and in line with what is known from the literature, we have found that Librium is indeed an effective agent in some cases. It should be given primarily for neurotic symptoms. In obsessive-compulsive neurosis, it has proved more effective than any other drug known to date. In psychosis and in behavioural disorders of organic origin, such as oligophrenia and encephalopathy, it does not seem to be effective enough. Its anticonvulsant action has not been satisfactory, but since it does not provoke seizures at low doses, it is excellent for secondary complaints of neurotic origin in epileptics. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Data on some relationships between blood and CSF sugar levels ]

DÉNES Iván, FARAGÓ András

[In 404 cases, the ratio of sugar content in blood to CSF was tested. Our experience shows that in some diseases the blood glucose/liquid glucose ratio (V/L Q) deviates significantly from the normal value of 1.5. In our opinion, this deviation is due to increased sugar consumption of nerve tissue in spinal processes and altered function of the choroid plexus in brain processes. Significantly altered V/L Q can be used in the differential diagnosis of radiculitis, radiculopathy, spinal tumour.]

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[This consensus document is intended to provide guidance for the effective and efficient treatment of asymptomatic individuals with high uric acid levels and gout patients.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

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