Clinical Neuroscience

[ANIMAL MODELS OF CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA - TESTING THERAPEUTIC STRATEGIES IN VIVO]

ERDŐ Franciska, KONSTANTIN-ALEXANDER Hossmann

SEPTEMBER 30, 2007

Clinical Neuroscience - 2007;60(09-10)

[Acute cerebral ischemia is one of the leading causes of mortality and chronic disability worldwide. Animal models of focal (stroke-type) and global (cardiac arrest-type) ischemia have been established to investigate the morphological, functional and molecular consequences and to design therapeutic strategies for the improvement of ischemic injury. Despite highly beneficial effects in experimental studies, most human clinical trials were disappointing, suggesting inefficacies in the design and/or translation of animal experiments. In this review the pathophysiologically relevant particularities of ischemia models will be discussed to provide a rational basis for the proper selection of animal models for testing therapeutic strategies under experimental conditions.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[PERSISTENT AKINETIC-RIGID SIDE EFFECTS OF NEUROLEPTICS MAY INDICATE WILSON'S DISEASE]

ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, SZALAY Ferenc, SCHMIDT Erzsébet, KOMOLY Sámuel, ILLÉS Zsolt

[Here we report two cases, where neuroleptic treatment provoked persistent akinetic-rigid symptoms resulting in the diagnosis of Wilson's disease. No liver function abnormalities suggested Wilson's disease in one of the cases. In both cases, the akinetic-rigid symptoms were originally attributed to side effects of neuroleptics, but symptoms persisted after discontinuation of treatment. In one of the cases, T2-weighted cranial MRI indicated bilateral hyperintense signals in the basal ganglia. Our cases suggest that in a subgroup of Wilson's disease, dopamin receptor antagonists may provoke akinetic-rigid neurological symptoms possibly due to the damage of dopaminergic neurons. Persistent akinetic-rigid side effects of neuroleptics in young patients thus require diagnostic tests to exclude Wilson's disease even in unsuspected cases.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[POSSIBLE ROLE OF THE BASAL GANGLIA IN THE GENERATION OF THE N30 POTENTIAL OF THE MEDIAN NERVE SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS]

BENICZKY Sándor, NAGY Helga, VARGA Edina, VÖRÖS Erika, KÉRI Szabolcs, VÉCSEI László

[Background and purpose - The origin and afferentation of the frontal N30 component of the median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) have not yet been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to assess the possible selective impairment of the N30 component in patients with lacunar infarcts of the basal ganglia as compared to patients with lacunar infarctions sparing the basal ganglia and to a group of healthy subjects. Methods - Median nerve SEPs were measured in ten patients with lacunar infarctions of the brain (but no cortical atrophy or leukoaraiosis) and 13 healthy volunteers. Four patients had lacunar infarctions affecting the basal ganglia and 6 patients had lesions affecting other structures. Results - In two patients with lesions affecting the head of the caudate nucleus, there was no identifiable N30 component on the affected side. In one patient with bilateral lesions of the globus pallidus, the amplitude of the N30 component was significantly reduced. In one patient with lesion of the tail of the caudate nucleus, the N30 component was unaffected. The amplitude of the N30 component was also reduced in two patients with frontal subcortical white matter lesions. In all the other subjects, we recorded normal N30 components on both sides. Conclusion - Our results further support the importance of the basal ganglia, especially the head of the caudate nucleus in the generation of the N30 component of the median nerve SEPs.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[IDIOPATHIC NOCTURNAL FRONTAL LOBE EPILEPSY - AN UNUSUAL EPILEPSY SYNDROME]

HALÁSZ Péter, SZŰCS Anna, KELEMEN Anna

[This paper provides an overview of the development of conceptions about nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy syndrome and describes the electro-clinical characteristics, the identity of the genetic and sporadic variant, and the relationship of the EEG and clinical signs with NREM sleep specific features. The differential diagnostic difficulties and open questions on the pathomechanism are emphasized especially in relation with the lack of epileptiform EEG signs, circumsribed seizure onset zone and cognitive deficits. The relationship of frontal automatisms and NREM parasomnias are also discussed in relation of the place of nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy among other epilepsies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[SIMULTANEOUS CENTRAL AND PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INVOLVEMENT IN SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS]

ILNICZKY Sándor, KAMONDI Anita, ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna, VÁRALLYAY György, GAAL Barbara, SZIRMAI Imre, NAGY György

[Systemic lupus erythematosus is a frequent autoimmune disease, affecting several organs, including the brain, spinal cord and nerves. Cerebral vasculitis, transverse myelitis and polyneuropathy are the most common neurological manifestations. We report a case of a 46 years old woman who suffered incomplete transverse myelitis in her age of 44. After 2 years the second relapse presented with arthralgias, painful paraesthesias and weakness of the lower limbs. Neurological signs suggested involvement of the central and the peripheral nervous system. Based upon clinical and laboratory findings systemic lupus erythematosus was diagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed two hyperintense lesions on T2 weighted scans within the cervical spinal cord. The brain scan was normal. Protein content was slightly elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid, with normal cell count. Electrophysiological examinations diagnosed a subacute sensory-motor axonal polyneuropathy. On methylprednisolone treatment her condition improved. Simultaneous development of central and peripheral lesions of the nervous system in cases with systemic lupus erythematosus may lead to a challenge to establish the diagnosis.]

Clinical Neuroscience

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The applications of transcranial Doppler in ischemic stroke

FINNSDÓTTIR Herdis, SZEGEDI István, OLÁH László, CSIBA László

Background: This overview provides a summary of the applications of transcranial Doppler (TCD) in ischemic stroke. Results: A fast-track neurovascular ultrasound protocol has been developed for detecting occlusion or stenosis. The technique is more reliable in the carotid area than in the posterior circulation. By monitoring the pulsatility index the in­crea­sed intracranial pressure can be diagnosed. TIBI score was developed for grading residual flow. TCD has been shown to accurately predict complete or any recanalization. Regarding recanalization, TCD has a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 88%, a positive predictive value of 96%, a negative predictive value of 78% and an overall accuracy of 91%, respectively. Sonothrombolysis seemed to be a promising application but randomized controlled trials have shown that it does not improve clinical outcome. TCD examination can detect microembolic signals (MES) which are associated with an increased risk of stroke. Micro­em­boli were detected in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis and during carotid endarterectomy. The number of microemboli can be decreased by antithrombotic therapy. Contrast en­chan­ced examination and Valsalva maneuver with continuous TCD monitoring can accurately screen for right-to-left shunt.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Systemic thrombolysis and endovascular intervention in postpartum stroke]

BERECZKI Dániel Jr., NÉMETH Beatrix, MAY Zsolt, SZAKÁCS ZOLTÁN, GUBUCZ István, SZIKORA István, SZILÁGYI Géza

[Introduction - There are no previously published cases about intravenously applied recombinant tissue plasminogen activator in acute ischemic stroke during puerperium. Case presentation - We report a 40-year-old woman with postpartum acute ischemic stroke caused by multiple cervical artery dissections treated by systemic thrombolysis and endovascular intervention. Discussion - There are only limited data regarding thrombolytic treatment in acute stroke during pregnancy and puerperium. Current acute stroke treatment guidelines - while considering pregnancy as a relative exclusion criterion - do not deal with the postpartum state. Conclusion - As the condition is rare, randomized controlled trials are not feasible, therefore further reports on similar cases could eventually help us suggest guidelines or at least propose recommendations for the acute thrombolytic treatment of strokes occurring in pregnancy and puerperium.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Comparison of hospitalized acute stroke patients’ characteristics using two large central-eastern european databases

ORBÁN-KIS Károly, SZŐCS Ildikó, FEKETE Klára, MIHÁLKA László, CSIBA László, BERECZKI Dániel, SZATMÁRI Szabolcs

Objectives – Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the European region. In spite of a decreasing trend, stroke related mortality remains higher in Hungary and Romania when compared to the EU average. This might be due to higher incidence, increased severity or even less effective care. Methods – In this study we used two large, hospital based databases from Targu Mures (Romania) and Debrecen (Hungary) to compare not only the demographic characteristics of stroke patients from these countries but also the risk factors, as well as stroke severity and short term outcome. Results – The gender related distribution of patients was similar to those found in the European Survey, whereas the mean age of patients at stroke onset was similar in the two countries but lower by four years. Although the length of hospital stay was significantly different in the two countries it was still much shorter (about half) than in most reports from western European countries. The overall fatality rate in both databases, regardless of gender was comparable to averages from Europe and other countries. In both countries we found a high number of risk factors, frequently overlapping. The prevalence of risk factors (hypertension, smoking, hyperlipidaemia) was higher than those reported in other countries, which can explain the high ratio of recurring stroke. Discussion – In summary, the comparatively analyzed data from the two large databases showed several similarities, especially regarding the high number of modifiable risk factors, and as such further effort is needed regarding primary prevention.

Hypertension and nephrology

[Cerebrovascular diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease]

KISS István, NAGY Judit

[The reason of the unfavourable life expectancy of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is not only the development of end-stage renal failure but the frequent appearance of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Chronic kidney damage itself is a cardiovascular risk state and the occurrence of CVD/associated diseases is significantly higher in chronic kidney failure. Beside risk stratification and valid treatment of CVD (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease e.g.) we and the international nephrological community have left the cerebrovascular diseases of CKD patients out of consideration. However, up to 50% of patients suffering a stroke will die immediately, only 10% of stroke survivors can continue his/her profession, but the others will be permanently disabled. High blood pressure is a strong predictor of stroke and of other CVD in most of the patients. In stroke risk reduction it is particularly important to reach the target blood pressure values. The main object of the “Live under 140/90 mmHg” programme of the Hungarian Society of Hypertension is to familiarize with target blood pressure itself and how to reach target blood pressure. In 2010, prevention, early diagnosis and management of stroke are the most important challenges of this programme (The Brain Control Programme). We think it is advisable to prepare and publish a clinical practice guideline in collaboration with stroke societies which is similar to the guidelines of international societies and of the Hungarian Society of Stroke but specific for CKD patients. This guideline would help to give a uniform, up-to-date treatment for the cerebrovascular diseases of CKD patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Utilization of acute vascular imaging and neurointervention for acute ischaemic stroke patients in 20 Hungarian stroke centers

POZSEGOVITS Krisztián, SZABÓ Géza, SZUPERA Zoltán, NAGY Péter, NÉMETH László, KONDÁKOR István, TUSA Csaba, BERENTE László, SALACZ Pál, VÉCSEI László, SAS Katalin, SEMJÉN Judit, NIKL János, SZAPÁRY László, KAKUK Anikó, RÓZSA Csilla, HORVÁTH Melinda, IMRE Piroska, KÖVES Ágnes, BALOGH István, MOLNÁR Sándor, FOLYOVICH András, AL-MUHANNA Nadim, BÉRES-MOLNÁR Katalin Anna, HAHN Katalin, KRISTÓF Piroska, SZÁSZ Attila Sándor, SZŰCS Anna, BERECZKI Dániel

Background - Acute mortality rate of stroke in Hungary is significantly higher than in Western Europe, which is likely to be partially attributable to suboptimal treatment. Subjects and methods - We examined the use of acute vascular imaging and mechanical thrombectomy for acute ischaemic stroke patients. We collected data on 20 consecutive patients from Hungarian stroke centres before 31st August 2016. Results - Out of the reported 410 patients, 166 (40.4%) underwent CT angiography and 44 (10.7%) had mechanical thrombectomy. Conclusion - Only about 1/3 of acute ischaemic stroke patients eligible for thrombectomy actually had it. The underlying reasons include long onset-to-door time, low utilization of acute vessel imaging and a limited neuro­intervention capacity needing improvement.