Clinical Neuroscience

[Alemtuzumab therapy 2017]

BIERNACKI Tamás, BENCSIK Krisztina, SANDI Dániel, VÉCSEI László

NOVEMBER 30, 2017

Clinical Neuroscience - 2017;70(11-12)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.70.0371

[Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system comprising of inflammation, demyelinisation and neurodegeneration. The natural history of MS is heterogenous. Owing to the vast range and severity of the symptoms MS can cause the effect of the disease on one’s cognitive and physical status is unpredictable. According to the new, phenotype based classification two subgroups can be distinguished; relapsing-remitting (RR) and progressive MS. Relapsing-remitting MS can be further divided into active and inactive disease. The activity of the disease can be proven either clinically and/or by radiological means. A patient’s disease is considered inactive, if it fulfills the criteriae set in the “no evidence of disease activity-3” (NEDA-3) concept, meaning that no progression can be seen on the MRI scans, the patient is relapse free and there is no worsening on any disability scale. Nowadays a paradigm shift can be seen in the treatment of MS. The aim of this shift is to provide each and every patient with the most potent medication best suiting his/her illness as soon as possible. Alemtuzumab offers a great option as either a first line treatment or as escalation therapy for patients with a highly active disease. The efficacy of alemtuzumab was proven in two phase III trials (CARE-MS I, II), where it was compared to subcutaneous interferon b-1a, administered three times weekly. In both studies alemtuzumab was superior to subcutaneous interferon b-1a in terms of relapse rate reduction, in all scouted MRI parameters. In the CARE-MS II trial it was found superior in terms of progression slowing. In the studies’ first 2 years 32% and 39% of the alemtuzumab treated patients managed to achieve the NEDA-3 state (data from CARE-MS II and I respectively). At the end of the 4 year extension of both studies these numbers have increased to 60% and 55% respectively. The aim of our synopsis is to suggest neurologists an evidence based guideline, a therapeutic algorithm to be used when they give their MS patients the very best, personalised treatment, and also to appoint the recently introduced alemtuzumab to its proper place in the algorithm.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

A case with reversible neurotoxicity induced by metronidazole

EREN Fulya, ALDAN Ali Mehmet, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GUL Gunay, SELCUK Hatem Hakan, SOYSAL Aysun

Background - Metronidazole is a synthetic antibiotic, which has been commonly used for protozoal and anaerobic infections. It rarely causes dose - and duration - unrelated reversible neurotoxicity. It can induce hyperintense T2/FLAIR MRI lesions in several areas of the brain. Although the clinical status is catastrophic, it is completely reversible after discontinuation of the medicine. Case report - 36-year-old female patient who had recent brain abscess history was under treatment of metronidazole for 40 days. She admitted to Emergency Department with newly onset myalgia, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision and cerebellar signs. She had nystagmus in all directions of gaze, ataxia and incompetence in tandem walk. Bilateral hyperintense lesions in splenium of corpus callosum, mesencephalon and dentate nuclei were detected in T2/FLAIR MRI. Although lumbar puncture analysis was normal, her lesions were thought to be related to activation of the brain abscess and metronidazole was started to be given by intravenous way instead of oral. As lesions got bigger and clinical status got worse, metronidazole was stopped. After discontinuation of metronidazole, we detected a dramatic improvement in patient’s clinical status and MRI lesions reduced. Conclusion - Although metronidazole induced neurotoxicity is a very rare complication of the treatment, clinicians should be aware of this entity because its adverse effects are completely reversible after discontinuation of the treatment.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Role of peginterferon-β-1a in the therapy of multiplex sclerosis]

SIMÓ Magdolna, ILJICSOV Anna

[The subcutaneous peginterferon-b-1a is recently introduced in the therapy of relapsing-remitting multiplex sclerosis (RRMS) patients. Pegylation of IFN b-1a improved pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, resulting in, increased biologic activity and a longer half-life. The efficacy of peginterferon-b-1a was proved by the ADVANCE study - a 2-year Phase 3, multicenter, randomized, double-blind study with a 1-year placebocontrolled period evaluating the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous peginterferon-b-1a administered every 2 or 4 weeks in patients with RRMS. Peginterferon-b-1a efficacy was maintained during the two years, with greater effects observed with every 2 week versus every 4 week dosing. Annualized relapse rate and confirmed disability progression was reduced comparing with patients on delayed treatment. Patients treated with continuous peginterferon-b-1a had fewer new or newly enlarging T2 lesions over 2 years than patients in the delayed treatment group. Adverse events were consistent with the known profiles of IFN b therapies in MS. The most commonly reported adverse events were injection site erythema, influenza-like illness. The less frequent administration is associated with fewer flu-like adverse events, which may improve patients’ compliance and adherence. Peginter-feron-b-1a could be an effective and safe treatment option for RRMS patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Change of therapeutic algorithm in sclerosis multiplex based on two case reports]

BIERNACKI Tamás, BENCSIK Krisztina, KINCSES Zsigmond Tamás, SANDI Dániel, FRICSKA-NAGY Zsanett, FARAGÓ Péter, VÉCSEI László

[The aim of our case reports is to demonstrate the therapeutic use and possibilities one has with alemtuzumab, should it be used either as a first or second line therapy. Our first patient's disease in the beginning seemed to be benign. It was not the case however, over several years the diesase showed high activity both radiologically and clinically, she was treated with alemtuzumab as part of an esclationbased therapeutic strategy. The second patient's disease on the other hand showed formidable activity since the very beginning both radiologically and clinically. Therefore we were facing a very disastrous prognosis on the long run, accordingly he received alemtuzumab treatment very early into his illness.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Tension-type headache in ulcerative colitis]

TAJTI Jr. János, LÁTOS Melinda, ÁBRAHÁM Szabolcs, SIMONKA Zsolt, PASZT Attila, LÁZÁR György

[Background and purpose - Tension-type headache is a very common disease with a high socio-economic impact as its lifetime prevalence is 30-78% in the general population. The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases is continuously rising. Limited data are accessible on quality of life in patients with surgically treated ulcerative colitis. The aim of our study is to examine quality of life, concerning headache, among patients who had undergone surgery due to ulcerative colitis. Methods - Between 1 January 2005 and 1 March 2016, surgery was performed due to ulcerative colitis in 75 patients. During this retrospective analysis the average duration of the follow-up was 46 (1-124) months. The pre-sence of headache was evaluated by the use of Brief Illness Perception and Headache Questionnaires. Results - Among the primary headache disorders (n=27), tension-type headache occurred in 19 (70.4%) cases, and 8 (29.6%) patients had migraine (without aura). Among tension-type headache cases 17 (89.5%) patients experienced episodic form and 2 (10.5%) suffered from chronic form. Patients with headache had obtained a significantly higher score on Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. Conclusions - According to our study tension-type headache is common among patients with ulcerative colitis. This observation raises the question whether stress plays role in the pathogenesis of both diseases, which influences and worsens considerably quality of life. Neurological examination, psychological and psychiatric guidance are worth considering in patients with ulcerative colitis.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Validation of the Hungarian version of Carlson’s Work-Family Conflict Scale

ÁDÁM Szilvia, KONKOLY THEGE Barna

Background and purpose - Work-family conflict has been associated with adverse individual (e.g., cardiovascular diseases, anxiety disorders), organizational (e.g., absenteeism, lower productivity), and societal outcomes (e.g., increased use of healthcare services). However, lack of standardized measurement has hindered the comparison of data across various cultures. The purpose of this study was to develop the Hungarian version of Carlson et al.’s multidimensional Work-Family Conflict Scale and establish its reliability and validity. Methods - In a sample of 557 employees (145 men and 412 women), we conducted confirmatory factor analysis to investigate the factor structure and factorial invariance of the instrument across sex and data collection points and evaluated the tool's validity by assessing relationships between its dimensions and scales measuring general, marital, and job-related stress, depressive symptomatology, vital exhaustion, functional somatic symptoms, and social support. Results - Our results showed that a six-factor model, similarly to that of the original instrument, fit the data best. Internal consistency of the six dimensions and the whole instrument was adequate. Convergent and divergent validity of the instrument and discriminant validity of the dimensions were also supported by our data. Conclusions - This study provides empirical support for the validity and reliability of the Hungarian version of the multidimensional Work-Family Conflict Scale. Deployment of this measure may allow for the generation of data that can be compared to those obtained in different cultural settings with the same instrument and hence advance our understanding of cross-cultural aspects of work-family conflict.

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[Health status and costs of ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary]

PÉNTEK Márta, GULÁCSI László, RÓZSA Csilla, SIMÓ Magdolna, ILJICSOV Anna, KOMOLY Sámuel, BRODSZKY Valentin

[Background and purpose - Data on disease burden of multiple sclerosis from Eastern-Central Europe are very limited. Our aim was to explore the quality of life, resource utilisation and costs of ambulating patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary. Methods - Cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed in two outpatient neurology centres in 2009. Clinical history, health care utilisation in the past 12 months were surveyed, the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the EQ-5D questionnaires were applied. Cost calculation was conducted from the societal perspective. Results - Sixty-eight patients (female 70.6%) aged 38.0 (SD 9.1) with disease duration of 7.8 (SD 6.7) years were involved. Fifty-five (80.9%) had relapsing-remitting form and 52 (76.5%) were taking immunomodulatory drug. The average scores were: Expanded Disability Status Scale 1.9 (SD 1.7), EQ-5D 0.67 (SD 0.28). Mean total cost amounted to 10 902 Euros/patient/year (direct medical 67%, direct nonmedical 13%, indirect costs 20%). Drugs, disability pension and informal care were the highest cost items. Costs of mild (Expanded Disability Status Scale 0-3.5) and moderate (Expanded Disability Status Scale 4.0-6.5) disease were 9 218 and 17 634 Euros/patient/year respectively (p<0.01), that is lower than results from Western European countries. Conclusion - Our study provides current inputs for policy making and contributes to understanding variation of costof- illness of multiple sclerosis in Europe.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Family planning in multiple sclerosis: conception, pregnancy, breastfeeding]

RÓZSA Csilla

[Family planning is an exceptionally important question in multiple sclerosis, as women of childbearing age are the ones most often affected. Although it is proven that pregnancy does not worsen the long-term prognosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, many patients are still doubtful about having children. This question is further complicated by the fact that patients – and often even doctors – are not sufficiently informed about how the ever-increasing number of available disease-modifying treatments affect pregnancies. Breastfeeding is an even less clear topic. Patients usually look to their neurologists first for answers concerning these matters. It falls to the neurologist to rationally evaluate the risks and benefits of contraception, pregnancy, assisted reproduction, childbirth, breastfeeding and disease modifying treatments, to inform patients about these, and then together come to a decision about the best possible therapeutic approach, taking the patients’ individual family plans into consideration. Here we present a review of relevant literature adhering to international guidelines on the topics of conception, pregnancy and breastfeeding, with a special focus on the applicability of approved disease modifying treatments during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The goal of this article is to provide clinicians involved in the care of MS patients with up-to-date information that they can utilize in their day-to-day clinical practice. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[MR imaging of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis in children. A review (in English language)]

PATAY Zoltán

[Inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) are relatively rare in children, but their relevance to public health is considerable due to frequent and significant long term morbidity and even mortality. As in adults, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and multiple sclerosis (MS) and their variants are the most common entities in this group of pathologies in the pediatric patient population. Recent efforts have focused on establishing standardized diagnostic criteria schemes to facilitate the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of these diseases, however especially with multiple sclerosis those have not been fully validated yet for disease occurring in children. In recent decades the role of MRI has been constantly increasing in the diagnostic work-up of suspected inflammatory diseases of the CNS as well as in the follow-up of patients with confirmed disease. Currently, MRI is the first-line diagnostic imaging modality in ADEM and MS and is fully integrated in the most widely used diagnostic criteria schemes, but it has a key role in clinical therapeutic research trials as well. This paper provides an update on the current concepts and strategies of MRI in inflammatory diseases of the CNS, as well as a review of the imaging semiology of the various disease entities and variants with emphasis on clinical and imaging particularities relevant to the pediatric patient population.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[50 years of tolperisone in clinical practice]

BÁLINT Géza

[Tolperisone is a centrally acting muscle relaxant that has both antispasticity and antispasmodic properties, but lacks the sedative effect of other muscle relaxants. In the past 50 years, millions of patients with spasticity due to neurological diseases and painful reflex muscle spasm have been treated with this drug. Although few welldesigned, double blind, controlled clinical trials have been published, the efficacy of tolperisone in the treatment of both spasticity and painful reflex muscle spasm is convincing. The tolerability and safety of the drug are well documented. In this respect, one of its greatest advantages is that it has no sedative effect, does not lengthen reaction time, and does not interfere with driving. Further, well-designed controlled trials are clearly required for widening the use of this excellent drug.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Symptomatic trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia without headache]

RÓZSA Anikó, KOVÁCS Krisztina, GUBA Katalin, GÁCS Gyula

[We report the case of a 60-year-old man who exhibited trigeminal autonomic symptoms on his right side (numbness of the face, reddening of the eye, nasal congestion) occurring several times a day, for a maximum of 60 se­conds, without any pain. The complaints were similar to trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia, just without any headache. Our 60-year-old male patient underwent a craniocervical MRI as part of his neurological workup, which revealed lesions indicative of demyelination. Further testing was guided (ophthalmological examination, VEP, CSF test) by the presumptive diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. It is likely that in his case the cause of these trigeminal and autonomic paroxysms is MS. Here we present an overview of the few cases we found in the literature, although we did not find any similar case reports. Perhaps the most interesting among these is one in which the author describes a family: a 54-year-old female exhibiting the autonomic characteristics of an episodic cluster headache, only without actual headache, her son, who had typical episodic cluster headaches with autonomic symptoms, and the woman’s father, whose short-term periorbital headaches were present without autonomic symptoms. We had not previously encountered a case of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia without headache in our practice, nor have we had an MS patient exhibiting similar neurologic symptoms. The significance of our case lies in its uniqueness. ]