Clinical Neuroscience

[Acute-phase proteins in various psychotic states]

SZILÁGY Á. Katalin1, FRÁTER Rózsa1, BOLLA Marianna1

MARCH 20, 1993

Clinical Neuroscience - 1993;46(03-04)

[Some of the so-called acute-phase proteins were identified in the sera of 27 psychotic female patients. Values measured in the acute psychotic state were compared to those measured in the period of stabilization of the same patient, whether an acute psychotic state could be qualified from this point of view as a stress reaction. In agreement with some of the literary data these results did not support the this hypothesis. In psychotic states the concentrations of the measured proteins decrease. In the paranoid group alpha-2-macroglobuline and, in the affective group coeruloplasmine and alpha-2-macro-glycoprotein show this tendency. It seems that the evaluation of acute phase proteins together with other biological indicators may provide new information in psychiatric diagnostics.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Országos Pszichiátriai és Neurológiai Intézet, Budapest

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