Clinical Neuroscience

[Acute neurosurgical management of severe thoraco-lumbar spinal injuries]

ZSOLCZAI Sándor1, PENTELÉNYI Tamás1, TÚRÓCZY László1, VERES Róbert1

JANUARY 20, 1993

Clinical Neuroscience - 1993;46(01-02)

[Authors show their experiences with up-to-date segmental stabilization methods in the acute neurosurgical management of severe thoraco-lumbar spinal injuries. Among the 134 acute operations during 5 years with at least 1 year follow-up 81 were performed by Fixateur Interne (AO-ASIF, W. Dick), and 53 by angle-stable posterior plate-fixation (Steffee or Eger plates). Reduction, decompression and stabilization were achieved by these instrumentations. Results are evaluated from the points of view of neurological recovery, bony union, restoration of patients comfort and complications. Also the principles of modern management of spine-injured patients, developed through a long evolution in the last decade, are reviewed. It is stated that both segmental stabilization methods were used as routine, and they were suitable for the treatment of the most of severe thoraco-lumbar spinal injuries. Results of these methods are much better than those of the long-rod systems, but on condition that emergency neurosurgical treatment should be done in the first 6-8 hours together with early skilled and competent rehabilitation in a well trained center.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Országos Traumatológiai Intézet, Idegsebészeti Osztály, Budapest

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