Clinical Neuroscience

[Acoustic CR®-neuromodulation - first experiencies in Hungary with novel patented method in therapy of chronic subjectiv tinnitus]

BENCSIK Beáta, GÁBORJÁN Anita, HARNOS Andrea, LÁSZLÓ Klára, VÉGSŐ Péter, TAMÁS László

MAY 30, 2015

Clinical Neuroscience - 2015;68(05-06)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.68.0189

[Objective - Acoustic CR®-neuromodulation is a novel patented method for the therapy of chronic subjective tinnitus and has been tested in Hungary, as one of the first European countries introducing this procedure. It can be used for the treatment of monaural or binaural tonal tinnitus. Suitability of patients for this therapy was assessed by the help of an appropriate set of criteria. Aim of our study was to analyze 6-month therapy and related measurement data of patients first treated with this method in Hungary and evaluate the results. Method - 27 outpatients (20 males, seven females) with a minimum of 6-month long history of subjective tinnitus were assessed (four detected on the right side, six on the left side, 17 on both sides) who were treated for six months by Acoustic CR®-neuromodulation. On 44 treated ears (21 right, 23 left), changes of tinnitus frequency and loudness were measured and analysed, using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) loudness/annoyance/pitch scores and Tinnitus Handicap Inventory tests, which were performed at defined intervals during the treatment period. Results - During this 6-month treatment period, significant decrease was detected in tinnitus frequency and loudness by tinnitometry (irrespective of the affected side), and an improvement in VAS annoyance/pitch scores and THI test results. VAS loudness did not show any significant changes. Conclusion - Acoustic CR®-neuromodulation therapy may be a useful treatment of subjective chronic tinnitus, but its efficacy should be proved in controlled clinical trials.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

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[Background - The Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale (UDysRS) was published in 2008. It was designed to be simultaneous valid, reliable and sensitive to therapeutic changes. The Movement Disorder Society organizing team developed guidelines for the development of official non- English translations consisting of four steps: translation/back-translation, cognitive pretesting, large field testing, and clinimetric analysis. The aim of this paper was to introduce the new UDysRS and its validation process into Hungarian. Methods - After the translation of UDysRS into Hungarian and back-translated into English, it was reviewed by the UDysRS translation administration team. Subsequent cognitive pretesting was conducted with ten patients. For the large field testing phase, the Hungarian official working draft version of UDysRS was tested with 256 patients with Parkinson’s disease having dyskinesia. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) determined whether the factor structure for the valid Spanish UDysRS could be confirmed in data collected using the Hungarian Official Draft Version. To become an official translation, the Comparative Fit Index (CFI) had to be ≥0.90 compared to the Spanish-language version. Results - For the Hungarian UDysRS the CFI was 0.98. Conclusion - The overall factor structure of the Hungarian version was consistent with that of the Spanish version based on the high CFIs for the UDysRS in the CFA; therefore, this version was designated as the Official Hungarian Version Of The UDysRS.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Watershed infarction in hypereosinophilic syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma in FIP1L1-PDGFR alpha-associated myeloid neoplasm

IMELDA Marton, PÓSFAI Éva, ANNUS János Kristóf, BORBÉNYI Zita, NEMES Attila, VÉCSEI László, VÖRÖS Erika

Introduction - The FIP1L1-PDGFR alpha-positive, hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is a new category of hematological entities. Various clinical symptoms may occur, with no specific characteristics in either the clinical picture or the neuroimaging findings, and this may give rise to a diagnostic dilemma. A report on a long follow-up period (10 years) in a case of HES that presented with neuropsychiatric symptoms appears to be unique. Besides the complexity of the diagnostic process, the successful treatment is discussed. Case report - The HES was diagnosed in a male patient at the age of 33 years, with involvement of the central nervous system and the myocardium. After the onset of the clinical signs, the MRI indicated bilateral cerebral and cerebellar cortico-subcortical lesions involving the watershed areas, mainly in the parieto-occipital regions. High-dose intravenous steroid (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day) alleviated the neurological symptoms within a few weeks, and the administration of imatinib (200 mg/day) resulted in an impressive regression of the hypereosinophilia and splenomegaly within 6 weeks. During the follow-up, the patient has continued to receive imatinib. The molecular remission has persisted, no new complaints have developed and the condition of the patient has remained stable. Conclusion - The timely recognition of the HES and identification of the disease subtype which led to the administration of imatinib may be the key to successful treatment. The long stable follow-up period gives rise to a new dilemma in the treatment of the HES in these special cases: for how long should a patient receive a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and may the treatment be suspended?

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Clinical Neuroscience

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