Clinical Neuroscience

[28 years in the service of the cooperation of national clinical neurosciences]

RAJNA Péter, TAJTI János

SEPTEMBER 30, 2018

Clinical Neuroscience - 2018;71(09-10)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.71.0303

[Two leading managers of the scientific journal currently publishing its 71st volume give an overview on the history and content- and form-related development of the journal. Recognizing the constantly decreasing role of paper-based literature products, the value system and the priorities of the journal were established more than 20 years ago: 1) preservation of high standards by achieving and maintaining international registration and annual qualification (i.e. impact factor); 2) enabling publication in Hungarian language for scientists living in Hungary and abroad; 3) displaying an ever broader spectrum of clinical neurosciences in the publications; 4) presentation of cutting-edge findings (related to the etiology, diagnostics, therapy, and care) of the most frequent and most relevant diseases in order to assure and enhance the quality of national clinical practice; 5) providing the possibility for the highest possible standard of scientific publication for Hungarian clinical neuroscientist; and finally 6) maintaining a readily available interaction surface and debate forum for the involved professionals in clinical questions of public interest. With respect to the above aspects, an outline is given of the efforts of the nearly three decades by listing editorial, publication, and other activities introduced throughout the history of the journal. The presumed strengths and weaknesses of the journal are summarized, the opportunities and limitations of the established objectives are highlighted, based on which the editors outline the most important tasks (SWOT analysis).]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Anterior cerebral artery infarcts; two years follow-up study

LÜTFÜ Hanoglu, ELMIR Khanmammadov, SEMA Demirci, ÜMMÜHAN Altin, DURSUN Kirbaş, TAHA Hanoglu, BURAK Yulug

Objectives – Anterior cerebral infarct (ACA) infarcts are reported very rare that is due to the compensatory collateral circulation provided by the anterior communicating artery. There are very few studies reporting the long-term follow-up results of ACA infarcts regarding their aetiology, clinical features and prognosis. Most studies reported in the literature vary between several months to one year. Patients and methods – A total of 27 patients with ACA infarcts were registered (14 women and 13 men). The mean age of the patients was 68.5 (age range: 45–89 years). Results – Bilateral ACA infarcts were reported in four patients (14.8%), right ACA infarct in 11 (40%) patients and left ACA infarct in 12 patients (44%). During the initial examination 15 patients (55.5%) were found to have apathy, 13 patients (48%) had incontinence, nine patients (33.3%) had primitive reflexes, 11 patients (40.7%) had aphasia, while six patients (22.2%) were found to suffer from neglect. At the end of one-year follow-up, five patients (22.7%) were reported to have apathy, 6 patients (27.2%) had incontinence, one patient (4.5%) had primitive reflexes, while one patient (4.5%) was found to have permanent aphasia, and no patients was found to suffer from neglect. Conclusion – Here we present our clinical data regarding the aetiology, specific clinical characteristics (including the speech disorders) and prognosis of 27 patients with ACA infarcts during a relatively longer follow-up period (3 months – 30 months) in compared to previous literature. We show that there are differences in the etiological factors of ACA infarcts between the Asian and European communities. Regarding speech disorders which are frequently reported during ACA infarcts, our study results are in agreement with other studies suggesting that this clinical picture is more than a real aphasia and associated with general hypokinesia and reduction in psychomotor activity.

Clinical Neuroscience

Caregiver burden and quality of life in early stages of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease

YUKSEL Burcu, AK Dogan Pelin, SEN Aysu, SARIAHMETOGLU Hande, USLU Celiker Sibel, ATAKLI Dilek

Objectives - The aim of this study was to assess the impact of early stage of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD) on caregiver burden with disease severity, duration, disability and psychiatric symptoms. Methods - 30 IPD patient (15 female, 15 male) - caregiver (18 female, 12 male) pairs participated in the study. Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) scale was used to provide the assessment of disease progression and Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was used for assessing disability and impairment. Zarit Caregiver Burden Inventory (ZCBI) was used to ascertain the distress experienced by caregivers. Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) was performed on both patient and caregiver groups to evaluate anxiety and depression. Depressive symptoms of both groups were also measured by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Patients’ psychotic symptoms were assessed using the part 1- mentation, behavior and mood section of UPDRS. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) was used to evaluate dementia symptoms and Short Form-36 (SF-36) was also used to assess quality of life. Results - We found significant correlation between caregiver burden with disease severity and duration. There was a significant difference between high UPDRS scores and the caregiver’s will for placing her/his patient in a long-term institution. Patients who had depression risk according to BDI had also high UPDRS scores. Patients with off period had higher UPDRS scores and lower SF-36 subdomains of general health, physical functioning, emotional role and social functioning. Conclusion - IPD is a chronic, progressive neuro- degenerative disease and comprises substantial burden on patients, families of patients and caregivers. The disease duration and disability have a remarkable impact on caregiver burden. For the good quality of caregiving, protective therapies should be recommended for caregivers if needed.

Clinical Neuroscience

A rare condition mimicking stroke: Diabetic uremic encephalopathy

TEKESIN Aysel, ERDAL Yuksel, MAHMUTOGLU Soydan Abdullah, HAKYEMEZ Ahmet, EMRE Ufuk

Uremic encephalopathy (UE) is a metabolic disorder associated with acute or chronic renal failure. It is characterized by the acute or subacute onset of reversible neurological symptoms and specific imaging findings. It is uncommon for uremic encephalopathy to be associated with acute bilateral lesions of the basal ganglia in diabetic uremic patients, and this can be seen most often in Asian patients. Here, we report a patient with diabetic uremic encephalopathy and bilateral basal ganglia lesions who developed acute onset dysarthria. The clinical and magnetic resonance brain imaging findings resolved after hemodialysis treatment.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Minimally invasive, extrapleural-anterolateral approach to the spine]

SZABÓ Viktor, BÜKI András, DÓCZI Tamás, SCHWARCZ Attila

[In spine surgery, minimally invasive approaches (MIS) are getting accepted and more popular worldwide during the last decades. It is due to the reduced intraoperative blood loss, decreased infection rate, less postoperative pain and earlier discharge from hospital compared to traditional approaches. The present paper puts forward a minimally invasive extrapleural approach to the thoracic spine that is not applied in Hungary. This new approach, in contrast to the standard costotransversectomy, provides direct visual control over the ventral surface of the dural sac. Furthermore, contrary to the transthoracic way, following minimally invasive extrapleural surgery thoracic drainage and intensive care are not necessary. The approach can be applied safely in treatment of ventral or ventrolateral pathologies of the thoracic spine. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: A review of the 2017 revisions of the McDonald criteria]

CSÉPÁNY Tünde

[The revolutionary progress of research in neuroimmu­nology has led to the introduction of disease modifying therapies in multiple sclerosis at the end of the last century. The International Panel on Diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis originally proposed the 2001 McDonald criteria to facilitate the diagnosis of MS in patients with the first objective neurological symptom(s) suggesting demyelinating event, when magnetic resonance imaging is integrated with clinical and other paraclinical diagnostic methods. New terms have been introduced to substitute clinical information by MRI: dissemination in space - indicating a multifocal central demyelinating process and dissemination in time - indicating the development of new CNS lesions over time. The criteria for diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis have continuously evolved, they were modified in 2005 and 2010 allowing for an earlier and more accurate diagnosis of MS over time, and they provided the most up-to-date guidance for clinicians and researchers. The last recommended revisions relied entirely on available evidence, and not on expert opinion thereby reducing the risk of the misdiagnosis. The 2017 McDonald criteria continue to apply primarily to patients experiencing a typical, clinically isolated syndrome. In this review, we provide an overview of the recent 2017 revisions to the criteria of dissemination in space and time with the importance of the presence of CSF-specific oligoclonal bands; keeping fully in mind that there is no better explanation for symptoms than diagnosis of MS. In the future, validation of the 2017 McDonald criteria will be needed in diverse populations. Further investigations are required on the value of new MRI approaches, on optic nerve involvement, on evoked potential and optical coherence tomography, in order to assess their possible contribution to diagnostic criteria.]

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MOLNÁR-TAGA Márta, KAPÓCS Gábor, KISS István

[Different science-metric indicators are great important in evaluating the work of scientists. The authors present the advantages and disadvantages of evaluation numbers which used in the national science in decades and describe in the last year introduced new evaluation criteria. In addition, they analyze and compare the current requirements of the Hungarian Science Bibliography (MTMT) and the Doctoral Schools of the four Hungarian Medical Sciences. Finally, they seek to find out what changes are to be expected later. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A single center experience and systemic analysis of cases in Turkey

USLU Ilgen Ferda, ELIF Gökçal, GÜRSOY Esra Azize, KOLUKISA Mehmet, YILDIZ Babacan Gulsen

We aimed to analyze the clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a single center as well as to review other published cases in Turkey. Between January 1st, 2014 and June 31st, 2017, all CJD cases were evaluated based on clinical findings, differential diagnosis, the previous misdiagnosis, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in our center. All published cases in Turkey between 2005-2018 were also reviewed. In a total of 13 patients, progressive cognitive decline was the most common presenting symptom. Two patients had a diagnosis of Heidenhain variant, 1 patient had a diagnosis of Oppenheimer-Brownell variant. Seven patients (53.3%) had been misdiagnosed with depression, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus or encephalitis. Eleven patients (87%) had typical MRI findings but only 5 of these were present at baseline. Asymmetrical high signal abnormalities on MRI were observed in 4 patients. Five patients (45.4%) had periodic spike wave complexes on EEG, all appeared during the follow-up. There were 74 published cases in Turkey bet­ween 2005 and 2018, with various clinical presentations. CJD has a variety of clinical features in our patient series as well as in cases reported in Turkey. Although progressive cognitive decline is the most common presenting symptom, unusual manifestations in early stages of the disease might cause misdiagnosis. Variant forms should be kept in mind in patients with isolated visual or cerebellar symptoms. MRI and EEG should be repeated during follow-up period if the clinical suspicion still exists.

Clinical Neuroscience

The etiology and age-related properties of patients with delirium in coronary intensive care unit and its effects on inhospital and follow up prognosis

ALTAY Servet, GÜRDOGAN Muhammet, KAYA Caglar, KARDAS Fatih, ZEYBEY Utku, CAKIR Burcu, EBIK Mustafa, DEMIR Melik

Delirium is a syndrome frequently encountered in intensive care and associated with a poor prognosis. Intensive care delirium is mostly based on general and palliative intensive care data in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of delirium in coronary intensive care unit (CICU), related factors, its relationship with inhospital and follow up prognosis, incidence of age-related delirium and its effect on outcomes. This study was conducted with patients hospitalized in CICU of a tertiary university hospital between 01 August 2017 and 01 August 2018. Files of all patients were examined in details, and demographic, clinic and laboratory parameters were recorded. Patients confirmed with psychiatry consultation were included in the groups of patients who developed delirium. Patients were divided into groups with and without delirium developed, and baseline features, inhospital and follow up prognoses were investigated. In addition, patients were divided into four groups as <65 years old, 65-75 yo, 75-84 yo and> 85 yo, and the incidence of delirium, related factors and prognoses were compared among these groups. A total of 1108 patients (mean age: 64.4 ± 13.9 years; 66% men) who were followed in the intensive care unit with variable indications were included in the study. Of all patients 11.1% developed delirium in the CICU. Patients who developed delirium were older, comorbidities were more frequent, and these patients showed increased inflammation findings, and significant increase in inhospital mortality compared to those who did not develop delirium (p<0.05). At median 9-month follow up period, rehospitalization, reinfarction, cognitive dysfunction, initiation of psychiatric therapy and mortality were significantly higher in the delirium group (p<0.05). When patients who developed delirium were divided into four groups by age and analyzed, incidence of delirium and mortality rate in delirium group were significantly increased by age (p<0.05). Development of delirium in coronary intensive care unit is associated with increased inhospital and follow up morbidity and mortality. Delirium is more commonly seen in geriatric patients and those with comorbidity, and is associated with a poorer prognosis. High-risk patients should be more carefully monitored for the risk of delirium.

Clinical Neuroscience

Autonomic nervous system may be affected after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery: A possible mechanism for persistence of symptoms after surgery

ONDER Burcu, KELES Yavuz Betul

After carpal tunnel surgery, some patients report complaints such as edema, pain, and numbness. Purpose – The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomic nervous system function in patients with a history of carpal tunnel surgery using sympathetic skin response (SSR). Thirty three patients (55 ±10 years old) with a history of unilateral operation for carpal tunnel syndrome were included in the study. The SSR test was performed for both hands. Both upper extremities median and ulnar nerve conduction results were recorded. A reduced amplitude (p=0.006) and delayed latency (p<0.0001) were detected in the SSR test on the operated side compared to contralateral side. There was no correlation between SSR and carpal tunnel syndrome severity. Although complex regional pain syndrome does not develop in patients after carpal tunnel surgery, some of the complaints may be caused by effects on the autonomic nervous system.