Ca&Bone

[Renal stone formation after parathyroidectomy in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism]

BERCZI Csaba, BALÁZS György, LUKÁCS Géza, TÓTH Csaba

AUGUST 20, 2003

Ca&Bone - 2003;6(04)

[INTRODUCTION - The incidence of renal stone formation was studied in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism after parathyroidectomy. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Ninety-two patients operated on for hyperparathyroidism were included in the study. In Group 1 the patients (n=44) had kidney stones before parathyroidectomy. Patients with no history of nephrolithiasis (n=48) before the operation were assigned to Group 2. After the operation the occurrence of renal stones was assessed for both groups.The presence of any association between the recurrence of renal stones and various clinical parameters was analysed. RESULTS - The serum concentration of Ca and parathormone decreased to the normal range in both groups after the operation. Stone formation was observed in nine cases in five patients during follow-up. All five patients belonged to Group 1.Thirty-three % of these recurrent stones were diagnosed within the first year and 89% within 5 years. Statistical analysis did not reveal any significant association between recurrent stone formation and gender, age, preoperative serum levels of Ca and parathormone or the histology of parathyroid glands. CONCLUSION - The incidence of recurrent renal stones after successful parathyroidectomy significantly decreased in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism.]

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Ca&Bone

[The effects of thyroid hormones on bone]

BAJNOK Éva, LAKATOS Péter

[The effects of thyroid hormones on bone tissue are of fundamental importance.They are required for skeletal development and later for normal bone metabolism.Their action is dose-dependent and also depends on the degree of differentiation of the target tissue. In childhood, thyroid hypofunction manifests itself in growth retardation, whereas hyperfunction will accelerate bone maturation.The exact mechanism of action of thyroid hormones on bone in later years is poorly understood, and their clinical relevance on the risk of bone fracture, the most important complication, is also unclear. In adults with hypothyroidism, bone mineral density (BMD) remains unchanged or even becomes increased, but the risk of fractures is elevated. In hyperthyroidism the bone turnover is increased, which may lead to a decrease in BMD and a higher risk of fracture. However, the results are inconsistent for endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism, where BMD may also decrease and fractures may occur more frequently.Treatment of hypothyroidism may temporarily result in increased fragility but this phenomenon seems to be only transient. During L-T4 replacement therapy the TSH level should be kept in the normal range, while with suppression, it should be set to the lower end of the normal range. During treatment of hyperthyroidism BMD temporarily increases and the risk of fractures decreases.The most effective way of preventing osteoporosis and bone fractures in all cases is the early recognition and treatment of thyroid diseases.The presence of other osteoporosis risk factors should always be considered. In some cases adjuvant therapy may be necessary to stop bone loss.]

Ca&Bone

[Vitamin D supply and the effect of short term calcium and vitamin D supplementation in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis or osteopenia]

FERENCZ Viktória és munkatársai

[INTRODUCTION - The effect of short-term calcium and vitamin D supplementation by a clinical nutriment on bone formation and resorption was studied in postmenopausal women with normal or decreased calcidiol serum levels. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Ninety-one postmenopausal women (age, 60-75 years) were enrolled in the study to investigate the effect of 1120 mg calcium and 208 IU vitamin D in a complex composition (Fortimel®, Nutricia) on bone turnover after 4 weeks of treatment. All women suffered from osteopenia or osteoporosis detected by bone densitometry. Serum parathyroid hormone levels and bone turnover markers (serum β-CrossLaps, osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase) were determined before and after the treatment. Moreover, calcidiol serum level was also measured at the beginning of the study to assess vitamin D supply. A questionnaire was used to assess gastrointestinal side effects and urinary calcium/creatinine ratio was calculated to estimate the risk of kidney stone development. RESULTS - In the entire patient group the mean serum level of β-CrossLaps was elevated (526.97±29.26 pg/ml) before the study and decreased during the treatment (485.58±28.27 pg/ml, p=0.03).The mean serum level of osteocalcin (28.58±1.37 vs. 27.03±1.36 ng/ml, p=0.025) and serum alkaline phosphatase activity (200.46±8.72 vs. 186.94±11.64 U/l, p=0.033) both decreased.The serum 25-OH vitamin D3 was below 30 ng/ml in 20 patients before the treatment, suggesting vitamin D deficiency.A correlation (r=0.508, p<0.001) between the decrease of bone formation and the decrease of bone resorption was found only in patients with normal serum 25-OH vitamin D3 concentration (>30 ng/ml). However, bone turnover did not decrease in patients with calcidiol deficiency. Urinary calcium/creatinine ratio remained unchanged during the treatment, but two patients suffered from constipation and one of them had diarrhea due to the calcium supplementation. CONCLUSIONS - Calcium and vitamin D supplementation in a complex clinical nutriment proved to be effective in decreasing bone turnover in postmenopausal women with good vitamin D supply, even after a short treatment period of 4 weeks. However, this treatment was ineffective in patients with vitamin D deficiency suggesting the importance of serum calcidiol measurement before calcium supplementation. Calcium in complex with other nutrients such as citrate did not increase the risk of renal stone formation in the short run, and only caused gastrointestinal problems in a tiny fraction of patients.]

Ca&Bone

[Assessment of quality of life in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis - A comparative study on the Hungarian adaptations of EuroQoL and Nottingham Health Profile]

PÉNTEK Márta, LICKER-FÓRIS Edit, LOVAS Kornélia, KALÓ Zoltán, TÓTH Miklós, TULASSAY Zsolt, RATKÓ István, GENTI György

[INTRODUCTION - After a brief introduction to the definition of quality of life and the importance of its measurement, two questionnaires, the EQ-5D and the Nottingham Health Profile are presented. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Fifty postmenopausal women with osteoporosis were included in the two-year prospective study to assess quality of life by the two generic questionnaires. Correlations were sought between the results of the EQ-5D and the Nottingham Health Profile, as well as between bone fractures and changes in quality of life.The validated Hungarian version of the Nottingham Health Profile was applied for the first time in postmenopausal osteoporosis. RESULTS - With the treatments applied, quality of life dimensions did not change significantly during the follow-up period and no significant correlation was found between the incidence of bone fractures and changes in quality of life.The pain, physical mobility, emotional reactions and energy dimensions of the validated Hungarian Nottingham Health Profile and its derivated index showed significant correlations with those of the EQ-5D. CONCLUSION -The validated Hungarian version of the Nottingham Health Profile quality of life questionnaire is a useful and applicable measurement tool in postmenopausal osteoporosis which correlates with the EQ-5D health state measure.]

Ca&Bone

[Quality of life and osteoporosis]

BÁLINT Géza

Ca&Bone

[FORTHCOMING CONGRESS]

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[Is there any association between the location of the parathyroid adenoma and the presence of nephrolithiasis in primary hyperparathyroidism?]

CSUPOR EMŐKE, TÓTH EDIT, MÉSZÁROS SZILVIA, FERENCZ VIKTÓRIA, SZŰCS János, LAKATOS Péter, HORÁNYI János, PERNER Ferenc, HORVÁTH CSABA

[INTRODUCTION - The majority of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism recurrently produce kidney stones, while the rest have other clinical manifestations (metabolic bone disease, acute pancreatitis, depression, etc.).The aim of this study was to examine whether there is any association between the clinical symptoms and the location of adenoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The records of 91 patients (10 males, 81 females, mean age: 61.9 years, range: 20-70 ys) operated for primary hyperparathyroidism between 1995 and 2000 were retrospectively evaluated. One patient was excluded from the study because of parathyroid cancer. Nephrolithiasis was noted in 55 cases and other clinical symptoms in 35 cases. The diagnosis of pHPT was confirmed by the surgery, which also determined the precise location of the adenoma. RESULTs - In the kidney stone group, the adenoma was located in the left inferior parathyroid gland in 50 cases (91 %), (χ2=67.5, p<0,00001), in the left superior parathyroid gland in 2 patients, while in 3 patients multiple hyperplasia was found. In the group without nephrolithiasis the adenoma was located in the right inferior parathyroid gland in 24 patients (69 %), (χ2=43.9, p<0,0001), while in 3 patients each it was detected in the left and right superior parathyroid gland, respectively. Multiple hyperplasia was also observed in 3 patients and ectopic location in 2 patients. CONCLUSION - The results raise the possibility that the clinical manifestation of the pHPT, i.e., whether it is or is not accompanied with nephrolithiasis, may be influenced by the location of the adenoma.This suggests that either the biological effects of the parathyroid hormone or its biologically active hormone fragments are different according to in which of the four glands it is produced.Therefore, we recommend that in patients with kidney stones where the preoperative imaging fails to reveal the location of the adenoma, during surgery the search for the adenoma should be started at the left inferior parathyroid gland.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Evaluation of bone mineral density in renal form of primary hyperparathyroidism]

CSUPOR EMŐKE, SZŰCS János, MÉSZÁROS SZILVIA, LAKATOS Péter, TÓTH EDIT, HORVÁTH CSABA

[INTRODUCTION - The most frequent manifestations of primary hyperparathyroidism are renal stones or calcipenic osteopathy. The aim of authors was to examine how bones are affected (change of bone mineral density and frequency of fractures) in the renal form of primary hyperparathyroidism. METHODS - Mean age of the patients was 57 years (26 -81 years), (4 men, 33 women). Bone mineral density was measured in the lower third of the radius, femoral neck and lumbar 2-4 vertebrae by densitometers. Moreover, occurrence of fractures and biochemical parameters characteristic for hyperparathyroidism (serum parathyroid hormone levels, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, urinary calcium/ creatinine) were examined. RESULTS - Bone mineral density was normal in 6 cases, osteopenic in 10 patients and 21 patients had osteoporosis. Altogether five patients had fractures. Bone mineral density and biochemical parameters were not different in patients with or without fractures. CONCLUSIONS - Bone mineral density decreases in renal form of primary hyperparathyroidism even if there is no bone disease in the clinical picture. Therefore, bone mineral density measurement is advisable for every patient with hyperparathyroidism.]

Ca&Bone

[Comparison of osteodensitometric and quantitative bone ultrasound parameters among patients with pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism, pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia and primary hyperparathyroidism]

CSUPOR EMŐKE, SZABOLCS István, FERENCZ VIKTÓRIA, GÓTH Miklós, IVÁN Gabriella, GYŐRI Gabriella, KOVÁCS LÁSZLÓ, TÓTH EDIT, MÉSZÁROS SZILVIA, HORVÁTH CSABA

[INTRODUCTION - Parathyroid hormone (PTH) excretion is increased both in primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) and in pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia). Pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism (P-PHP) is considered to be the normocalcemic form of pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia. Our aim was to assess bone mineral content and bone quality as well as to determine whether these parameters are related to PTH levels in the above mentioned disorders. PATIENTS AND METHOD - 10 patients with pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (P-PHP, age: 41.6 ±5.4 ys) were compared to 10 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) and to 10 healthy subjects, matched for age and gender. Moreover, nine patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP, age: 34.2 ±5.43 ys) were compared to nine age- and gender-matched patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and to nine healthy controls, respectively.The occurrence of previous bone fractures was recorded and bone mass was measured (by dual photon absorptiometry on the axial bones and by single photon absorptiometry on the forearm). Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) examination was performed both on the calcaneus by broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA, dB/MHz) and speed of sound (SOS, m/s) measurements and on the proximal phalanges by amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AdSOS, m/s) measurements. In addition, some laboratory parameters of calcium metabolism were tested. RESULTS - No difference was found between PHP Ia and pHPT in bone mass.The lowest value was observed at the radius. Among the QUS parameters, pathologically low AdSOS was found at the phalanges in PHP Ia and it was lower than in pHPT patients, whereas at the calcaneus BUA showed a similar tendency. Bone mass did not significantly differ between P-PHP and healthy controls, it was decreased, however, at the forearm in the patients. Pathological AdSOS was found in P-PHP, which was lower than in pHPT. SOS at the calcaneus was lower in P-PHP than in pHPT, though it was not considered pathological. Laboratory results were typical for the diseases and the radiological examinations confirmed the diagnosis. Bone fractures occurred in three and two patients with PHP Ia and P-PHP, respectively, while no fractures were recorded in the pHPT and healthy groups. CONCLUSION - Bone loss among patients with PHP Ia is considered to be the impact of PTH excess on bone tissue.The deterioration of bone quality and architecture may play a role in the development of bone fractures.]