Ca&Bone

[FORTHCOMING CONGRESSES]

FEBRUARY 14, 2007

Ca&Bone - 2007;10(01)

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Ca&Bone

[The rehabilitation team and distinct representatives of medicine in the service of osteopenic patients]

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[István Holló, MD, professor 1926-2007]

SZŰCS János

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[The increase of fracture risk in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus]

HULLÓ DANIELLA

[Studies in the last couple of years found more and more convincing evidence about the fact that impaired glucose metabolism leads to structural changes in the skeletal system leading toward osteoporosis. While patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus have decreased bone density, measurement showed increased bone mineral density in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite these differences, risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures is increased in both groups of diabetic patients. Decreased pancreatic beta cell function is accompanied by several hormonal disturbances leading to decreased bone formation even in the early stage of diabetes. Peak bone mass of diabetic children is lower than found in nondiabetic children. Late complications of diabetes, vascular and neuronal impairments, impaired renal function, and secondary hormonal disturbances are added to this process. IGF-1 may have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in diabetes. The structure of the molecule is similar to insulin. IGF-1 has effect on normal bone formation, inhibits the apoptosis and interferes with several other metabolic pathways. IGF-1 mediates the effect of growth hormone to the muscular and skeletal system. IGF-1 level decreases with age, and lower level of IGF-1 is found in diabetic patients. Long term complications of diabetes can also occur, which may enhance the process of bone resorption. Although the evidence is growing that fracture risk is higher in diabetic patiens, there are still scientists who question the association between the two disorders.]

Ca&Bone

[Higher bone fracture prevalence in postmenopausal pollen allergic women]

FERENCZ VIKTÓRIA, MÉSZÁROS SZILVIA, CSUPOR EMŐKE, TÓTH EDIT, BORS Katalin, FALUS ANDRÁS, HORVÁTH CSABA

[Our aim was to investigate whether pollen allergy can affect bone mass and fractures in postmenopausal women. A total of 125 postmenopausal pollen allergic women (mean age 61.26 years) were split into four groups: treated neither with H1 histamine receptor (H1R) antagonist nor with inhaled corticosteroid (n=43), treated only with H1R antagonist (n=53), treated both with H1R antagonist and inhaled corticosteroid (n=17), treated only with inhaled corticosteroid (n=12) for at least five years, seasonally. One-hundred non-allergic postmenopausal subjects matched for age, body mass index (BMI) and age at menopause served as controls. Overweight and obesity (25 kg/m2 ≤ BMI) were common among allergic women (76%). Allergic patients without treatment had a slightly lower bone density than their non-allergic mates. Untreated allergic had almost triple the rate of prevalent low-energy fractures (distal forearm, hip and clinical vertebral fractures: 34.9%) compared to non-allergic women (13%, χ2 p=0.003). Bone fracture occurred more often in H1R-only treated patients (30.19%) than in controls (χ2 p=0.01), however, clinical vertebral or hip fractures developed neither in those treated only with H1R antagonist nor in those who received both H1R antagonist and inhaled corticosteroid. Bone fractures were more frequent among patients with inhaled steroid treatment than among patients with a combined treatment of inhaled steroid and antihistamine (50% vs. 29.4%). BMI predicted prevalent fractures at 1.278 (95% CI, 1.047 to 1.559, p=0.016) for 1 kg/m2 increase among untreated allergic patients. In conclusion we found a high prevalence of low-energy fractures among pollen-allergic postmenopausal women, which was associated with obesity. It is possible that the H1R antagonists compensate for the negative effect of pollen-allergy and the adverse effect of inhaled corticosteroid treatment on bone fracture risk.]

Ca&Bone

[Osteology Congress]

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