Ca&Bone

[Antiresorption - same goal, different ways]

HORVÁTH CSABA1

APRIL 15, 2009

Ca&Bone - 2009;12(01)

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, I. sz. Belgyógyászati Klinika, Budapest

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Further articles in this publication

Ca&Bone

[XIIITH OROM CONGRESS]

Ca&Bone

[RANKL-specific denosumab in the treatment of osteoporosis - Possible adverse effects of long-term use]

TANKÓ László

[According to the results of a recent clinical trial, the antiresorptive effect of a single 60-mg injection of denosumab, a monoclonal antibody specific to RANKL (receptor activator of NFκB ligand) substantially exceeds the effect of alendronate (70 mg weekly). Despite these differences, 1-year increases in bone density at the lumbar spine are virtually identical for both agents. The author summarizes experimental and clinical observations illustrating potential consequences of osteoclast deficiency and a constantly low rate of bone resorption for osteoblast function, bone mineralization, bone quality parameters, and mechanical properties, which all may have important implications for bone fragility. These observations also raise the question whether treatment efficiency is truly improved by aggressively pushing the limits of antiresorptive action.]

Ca&Bone

[Management of hip fractures: practice, results, and problems in the last decade]

KRICSFALUSY Mihály, FLÓRIS István, CSERHÁTI Péter

[Among fractures attributable to osteoporosis, hip fractures are associated with the most severe consequences and the greatest costs. Surgical therapy for this condition is continuing to improve. Increasingly recent implants and techniques are being developed and introduced to successfully control postoperative adverse events. The authors briefly outline actual practice in Hungary and present some results of the follow-up of their patients in the last decade. These show that, in order to improve outcomes of hip fracture patients, all domains of management need to be addressed.]

Ca&Bone

[The role of physiotherapy/therapeutic exercise in the treatment of osteoporotic hip fractures]

MAKOVICSNÉ Landor Erika, KOLTAI Endréné

[The authors briefly present the role of the physiotherapist in the treatment of osteoporosis. Primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of locomotion system problems is analyzed. The authors’ specific focus is the complex physiotherapeutic treatment of osteoporotic hip fractures. They propose a prevention program involving locomotion exercises for the prevention of falls. Analyzing the physiotherapists’ activities, the authors describe the most important aspects of patient education and patient information.]

Ca&Bone

[Significance of quantitative ultrasound bone densitometry and its introduction into pediatric bone medicine]

HOSSZÚ ÉVA, HAZAY Máté, LIPTOVSZKY Janka

[INTRODUCTION - Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) examination of the bones provides information about not only bone mineral mass but also its quality. Adaptation of the method to the continuous growing of body size allowed its pediatric use. However, for introduction into routine use, a normal reference range in healthy children has to be established. The primary aim of this study was to establish the Hungarian reference range for QUS of the bone - in both genders and across a wide range of ages. As a secondary aim, QUS and the bone density were compared to internationally accepted data to comparatively determine correlations of specific QUS measurements to photon absorption based values. SUBJECTS AND METHODS - Measurement was performed on the calcaneus by Achilles Insight (Lunar, WI) device. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) of the lumbar spine was measured using the Double X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) device DPX-L (Lunar, WI). Latter was also used to measure total body calcium content. Measurements were performed in 154 healthy boys and girls aged 5 to 18 years. We analyzed data as a function of age, and correlated results of he two types of measurement. RESULTS - Gender-specific reference ranges for normally developing children of the above ages were built up for Broadband Ultrasound Attenuation (BUA) and Speed of Sound (SOS). BUA showed the best correlation to BMD. SOS and Stiffness Index (SI) derived from BUA and SOS, correlated weaker to BMD, consonantly with the fact that SOS reflects bone elasticity (quality) rather than bone mineral mass. CONCLUSION - These newly constructed normal ranges can provide a basis of performing pediatric bone examinations using QUS, which is less expensive and more mobile.]

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[A growing body of evidence suggests that sleep plays an essential role in the consolidation of different memory systems, but less is known about the beneficial effect of sleep on relational memory processes and the recognition of emotional facial expressions, however, it is a fundamental cognitive skill in human everyday life. Thus, the study aims to investigate the effect of timing of learning and the role of sleep in relational memory processes. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. Our results suggest that the timing of learning and sleep plays an important role in the stabilizing process of memory representation to resist against forgetting.]

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Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral haemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, FOLYOVICH András, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, BAKOS Mária, VÁRALLYAY György, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

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Introduction - Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a frequent problem among young adults. Hopefully, regeneration can occur in PNI unlike central nervous system. If nerve cut is complete, gold standard treatment is surgery, but incomplete cuts have been tried to be treated by medicines. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare clinical and histopathological outcomes of independent treatment of each of Vitamin B12 (B12) and Vitamin D3 (D3) and their combination on sciatic nerve injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods - Experimental animal study was performed after the approval of BEH Ethics Committee No. 2015/10. 32 rats were grouped into four (n=8) according to treatment procedures, such as Group 1 (controls with no treatment), Group 2 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12), Group 3 (oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3), Group 4 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12+ oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3). Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and histopathological analysis were performed. Results - SFIs of Group 2, 3, 4 were statistically significantly higher than controls. Group 2 and 3 were statistically not different, however Group 4 was statistically significantly higher than others according to SFI. Axonal degeneration (AD) in all treatment groups were statistically significantly lower than in Group 1. AD in Group 4 was significantly lower than in Group 2 and 3; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and 3. There was no significant difference between Group 1,2 and 3 in Axonolysis (A). But A of Group 4 was significantly very much lower than all others. Oedema- inflammation (OE-I) in all treatment groups were significantly lower than in Group 1; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and group 4. OE-I in Group 2 and 4 were significantly lower than in Group 3. There were no significant differences between Group 1, 2 and 3 in damage level scores; score of Group 4 was significantly lower than of Group 1. Conclusions - B12 and D3 were found effective with no statistically significant difference. But combined use of B12 and D3 improve nerve healing synergistically. We recommend combined use of B12 and D3 after PNI as soon as possible.

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CICEKLI Esen, TITIZ Pinar Ayse, TITIZ Ali, OZTEKIN Nese, MUJDECI Banu

Background - Our objectives were to determine the differences in the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) responses in patients diagnosed with early staged idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) compared to the normal population and evaluate the vestibular system disorder causing balance-posture disorders. Second aim of this study was to investigate caloric test responses particularly in early staged PD compared to normal popu­lation. Material and methods - Thirty patients (14 females and 16 males; mean age, 60.6 ± 13.1 years) diagnosed with idiopathic PD and 28 healthy subjects (20 males and 8 females; mean age, 59.1 ± 6.4 years) were included. The patient and control groups were subdivided according to their age, gender and the patient group was subdivided according to onset time of the Parkinson symptoms, Hoehn-Yahr staging. The subgroups were compared for VEMP and caloric test responses. Results - There were no significant differences between the study and control groups for right and left VEMP measurements. Patients over 60 years and under 60 years did not show significant differences in terms of right and left mean VEMP measurements. However, P1 amplitude was significantly lower in patients over 60 years old (P = .004). Gender, disease duration, BERG balance scale and Hoehn-Yahr stage had no effect on the VEMP amplitudes. There was no significant correlation with the side of Parkinsonian symptoms to the side of canal paresis (P = .566) and the side on which no VEMP response was obtained in caloric test. Conclusion - VEMP responses were not different between PD and healthy subjects. VEMP P1 amplitude was decreased with age in PD group. Canal paresis and symptoms side were not statistically correlated in caloric test.